If the vice presidential nominees want to help their respective running mates, Tuesday is the biggest chance to do so. Democratic VP nominee Tim Kaine and his Republican counterpart, Mike Pence, are set to square off at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia.

The task at hand for Pence and Kaine is perhaps a bit different than the debate goals for their running mates, Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, respectively. Kaine and Pence are charged with making a good impression, but also not diverting from the talking points of the presidential candidates. In other words, the debate is about them but it's not really about them. Indiana Gov. Pence and Virginia Sen. Kaine are both experienced politicians who've debated before, but Tuesday's event is a different animal.

"It's a different kind of a debate for me because I have done debates where it's, at the end of it, 'Please vote for Tim Kaine.' If I talk too much about Tim Kaine during my debate I'm wasting my time," Kaine told reporters.

The event is scheduled to being at 9 p.m. EDT and run about an hour and a half through 10:30 p.m. EDT. There aren't any scheduled commercial breaks. The format will be pretty familiar for debate watchers. It'll be broken down into nine segments of about 10 minutes apiece. The moderator, CBS's Elaine Quijano, will ask questions then give each candidate two minutes to respond. 

A number of television networks — including CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox, PBS, Univision, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and C-SPAN — will broadcast the debate. You can also follow along online. NBC will live stream on its YouTube page. That feed is also embedded at the bottom of this page. ABC News will broadcast live to Facebook, which should include some interactive elements for viewers.

Trump has also announced he'll be live-tweeting the event, which, if nothing else, is sure to prove to be entertaining. You can follow along with his Twitter timeline here