Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met Abu Dhabi's crown prince Monday during the first visit by a leader of the Jewish state to the United Arab Emirates, just over a year after the two countries established ties.

Bennett's visit comes as Israel pursues a diplomatic push against international nuclear talks in Vienna that could ease sanctions on its arch-foe, Iran.

He was received by Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan at his private palace, where they exchanged greetings before heading inside for more than four hours of talks, Israeli officials said.

A handout picture from the Israeli Government Press Office shows Abu Dhabi's Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, on the right, receiving Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett on December 12, 2021
A handout picture from the Israeli Government Press Office shows Abu Dhabi's Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, on the right, receiving Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett on December 12, 2021 GPO via AFP

The crown prince hoped Bennett's visit "would contribute to further cooperation for the benefit of the peoples of the two countries and the peoples of the region", the UAE's official WAM news agency said.

The visit comes 15 months after the wealthy UAE broke with decades of Arab consensus and forged diplomatic ties under a series of US-brokered deals known as the Abraham Accords.

Bennett, who arrived late on Sunday, said his trip reflected a "new reality" for the Middle East.

In his file photo taken on August 31, 2020, the Emirati, Israeli and US flags fly at the Abu Dhabi airport at the arrival of the first-ever commercial flight from Israel to the UAE
In his file photo taken on August 31, 2020, the Emirati, Israeli and US flags fly at the Abu Dhabi airport at the arrival of the first-ever commercial flight from Israel to the UAE AFP / KARIM SAHIB

"In my opinion, this is... the new reality this region is witnessing, and we are working together to ensure a better future for our children," he told WAM.

Israel is also stepping up its diplomatic efforts against the renewed talks in Vienna with Iran, over the Islamic republic's nuclear programme.

Bennett has called for the talks to be halted, accusing Tehran of "nuclear blackmail" and charging that it will use any revenue from sanctions relief to bolster a military arsenal that can harm Israel.

The visit comes 15 months after the wealthy UAE broke with decades of Arab consensus and forged diplomatic ties under a series of US-brokered deals known as the Abraham Accords
The visit comes 15 months after the wealthy UAE broke with decades of Arab consensus and forged diplomatic ties under a series of US-brokered deals known as the Abraham Accords GPO via AFP

On Thursday, global powers began meetings with Iran in Vienna aimed at reviving a deal to curb the nuclear programme after former US president Donald Trump pulled out in 2015.

Ahead of those talks, the UAE's national security adviser met Iran's ultraconservative President Ebrahim Raisi in Tehran, a rare trip by a senior Emirati official.

Former Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, US president Donald Trump, Bahrain FM Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani and UAE FM Abdullah bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan at the signing of the Abraham Accords at the White House on September 15, 2020
Former Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, US president Donald Trump, Bahrain FM Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani and UAE FM Abdullah bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan at the signing of the Abraham Accords at the White House on September 15, 2020 GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA via AFP / ALEX WONG

In Abu Dhabi, Bennett and Sheikh Mohammed discussed cooperation in "various investment, economic, trade and development areas", WAM news agency said.

The Israeli prime minister also spoke of "limitless future opportunities" to develop trade with the UAE.

"Israel, like the UAE, is a regional hub for trade. Our cooperation provides unprecedented economic opportunities not only for us, but for more countries," he was quoted as saying.

Bennett said prior to leaving for home that he was optimistic after his "good visit" to the UAE, and thanked Sheikh Mohammed for the "very warm hospitality".

"Throughout the day we had meaningful, in-depth and straightforward talks about our two nations, about the region and about our economy and technology and what we can do together," he said in a recorded statement.

The UAE last year became the third Arab nation to establish full diplomatic relations with Israel after Egypt and Jordan, and was swiftly followed by Bahrain and Morocco.

Sudan also agreed to normalise ties with Israel under the Abraham Accords, but full relations have not yet materialised.

The agreements were negotiated by Bennett's predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu, who said they would offer Israel new regional allies against Iran and bolster its diplomatic efforts to stop Tehran from acquiring nuclear weapons.

Iran claims it only wants to develop a civilian nuclear capability, but Western powers say its stockpile of enriched uranium goes well beyond that, and could be used to develop an atomic weapon.

On Sunday, the G7 grouping of the world's richest nations warned time was running out to renew the deal with Iran.

The Vienna talks were Iran's "last chance to come to the negotiating table with a serious resolution", said Foreign Secretary Liz Truss, from G7 host Britain.