Kate Middleton always wears plasters on her hand for an absurd reason.

The Duchess of Cambridge was recently spotted with one while at the Tusk Conservation Awards. Her skin-tone plaster was seen on top of her right middle finger, and it is in a circular shape.

Josie Griffiths, a journalist for The Sun, claimed that Middleton may constantly be nicking her hands and this is why she often gets wounds. It is also possible that Middleton is clumsy when doing things so it’s easy for her to get wounds.

The mom of two was also photographed with a plaster on her thumb two Christmases ago when she was in Sandringham. Middleton was photographed walking with Princess Charlotte at that time. Royals are known for unwrapping their presents on Christmas Eve, and she might have gotten the wound while doing this.

In November 2016, Middleton was seen with a bigger plaster placed on top of her left hand. At that time, she was photographed leaving the Nelson Trust Women’s Center.

Months earlier, Middleton went to Luton to show her support to the youth. She once again had a plaster on her thumb, which was evident when she gave a royal wave to fans.

In 2014, Middleton was photographed chatting with Dame Helen Mirren and Sir David Attenborough at a Buckingham Palace event. While chatting with Queen Elizabeth II’s guests, her thumb was seen covered with a plaster.

And in January 2016, Middleton covered her middle finger with a plaster when she visited the Fostering Network to celebrate the work of the young foster caregivers. Three days later, Middleton visited Kensington Leisure Center, and she still had a plaster on her finger.

Other instances where Middleton was seen with a plaster on her hand also occurred when she went partying at a nightclub in Bouji, while at the RAF church St. Clement Danes, and during her visit to the Gatcombe Park Festival.

Kate Middleton Kate Middleton always gets wounds on her fingers and hands. Pictured: Middleton views letters relating to the three brothers of her great-grandmother who fought in the First World War while on a visit to the Imperial War Museum on October 31, 2018 in London, England. Photo: Getty Images/Frank Augstein-WPA Pool