Coca Cola Co.'s (NYSE: KO) newest product will take a new approach to thirst quenching. No bottles, cans, or even soda will be involved in the new drops from Coke.

Dasani Drops are the latest product to come from the world's biggest beverage company. The product will be available in stores this October for about $4 and can be squeezed into a bottle of water to instantly add one of four flavors to the drink.

John Roddey, vice president of Coca-Cola's water, tea and coffee business for North America, said he thinks that the new advancement in hydration is a step forward for the company. "I think there's an opportunity beyond just flavored waters," Roddey told the Associated Press.

Coca-Cola's move follows Kraft Food Inc. (Nasdaq: KFT), which last year released MiO water enhancer, spawning several copycats.

With no official plans as of right now, Roddey has expressed interest in making a tea products in the squeeze drops style. The benefit of these drops over using sugars or powder to make fruit drinks and teas is that drops are easier to use in different amounts, he said.

Once a pouch of sugar or powder has been opened, people will pour the entire thing into a bottle. Coca Cola's new Dasani Drops will offer up to 32 servings in one pouch, the AP reported, so people will save money on bottled teas and can have a less intense flavor in their drinks.

Consumers won't have to worry about calories with the Dasani Drops, because they use artificial sweeteners and have zero calories. The diet-friendly drops could be a turn off to people who try and avoid artificial sweeteners for health purposes, though.

Despite health concerns from certain customers, the AP reported that Coca-Cola representatives feel the drops will increase the consumption of water. The company has already seen increases in the sales of its Dasani brand of bottled water, which rose 13 percent in the first half of 2012, the AP reported, citing Beverage Digest.

The soft drink company is hoping to distribute Dasani Drops wherever  Dasani water bottles are sold, the AP reported. "We're looking to make this as broad as we can," Roddey told the wire service.