Joan Rivers left her estimated $150 million fortune to her family, friends, staff and several charity organizations, the comedienne’s will revealed Tuesday, according to reports. The late “Fashion Police” star reportedly named her daughter, Melissa Rivers, as the executor of the will with "the broadest and most absolute permissible direction."

Joan also reportedly named her long-time business manager Michael D. Karlin and interior designer Robert Higdon as co-executors of her trust. Melissa will inherit an unspecified amount in cash and all of Joan's tangible property, the court document obtained by celebrity news website Page Six revealed. The will also mentioned that Melissa’s son Edgar Cooper Endicott, and Joan's niece Caroline Waxler and nephew Andrew Waxler will also receive money.

Charities named in Joan’s will included California's Guide Dogs for the Blind, the Jewish Guild Healthcare in Manhattan, Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Jewish Home and Hospital Federation of Manhattan, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and New York-based God's Love We Deliver. The 81-year-old also reportedly left an unspecified amount of her estate to her publicist Scott Currie, and assistants Jocelyn Pickett and Sabrina Lott-Miller.

"Nothing can ever make up for the loss I feel every day. [Joan] was such a big part of my life for over 25 years. She was an incredible lady,” Currie reportedly said.

The will and trust documents were signed on Nov. 16, 2011, and Joan had added a provision that anyone who tries to challenge either the will or the trust will be disinherited, the New York Daily News reported. 

Joan died on Sept. 4 after spending nearly a week on life support at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital. The star went into cardiac arrest during a nonsurgical procedure at the Yorkville Endoscopy clinic, following which she was rushed to nearby Mount Sinai on Aug. 28. It was rumored that a physician did an unauthorized biopsy at the clinic, which caused her vocal cords to swell and cut off her air supply. The clinic later denied that the biopsy was performed.

In late October, reports had surfaced that Melissa was planning to file a lawsuit against the Manhattan clinic.

On Oct. 16, the New York City medical examiner said in a report that Joan died from brain damage due to lack of oxygen. Her death was classified as a “therapeutic complication” by the medical examiner, meaning it was the result of a predictable complication of a medical procedure.