A new survey conducted by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization, found 44 percent of millennials would rather live in a socialist nation than a capitalist country. 

To obtain this information, the research and data firm YouGov surveyed 23,000 people aged 16 and over. Two of the survey’s findings included that 59 percent of total Americans would rather live in a capitalist country, with 34 percent preferring a socialist nation.

When focusing on millennials, the survey revealed 44 percent of those surveyed would rather live in a socialist nation, compared to 42 percent who would prefer a capitalist country. The socialist movement saw an increase in youth following during Senator Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign, as he advertised a platform of “Democratic Socialism.” 

Other topics covered were the definition of communism and socialism, the political situation in Venezuela and the favorability of communism. The October survey also reported some Americans surveyed see Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong and Kim Jong Un as “heroes.” The survey generally concluded millennials confuse socialism and communism, with others mistaking fascism for communism.

Marion Smith, executive director of the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, expressed his concern over the nature of the data.  

“Millennials now make up the largest generation in America, and we’re seeing some deeply worrisome trends,” he said. “Millennials are increasingly turning away from capitalism and toward socialism and even communism as a viable alternative.”

Although the survey reported millennials’ views on communism, it also found 71 percent of those surveyed cannot correctly define the term. Other results of the survey included that 53 percent of millennials believe America’s economic system works against them.

To contrast this, 66 percent of Generation Z said America’s economic system works for them. Despite the disparities in political and economic beliefs, 80 percent of people surveyed viewed the divide between the rich and poor as a serious issue.

crowd Thousands of people attend a rally for Democratic Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders in New York City's Washington Square Park on April 13, 2016 in New York City. During his campaign, support for socialism rose among young people due to his liberal, Democratic Socialist platform. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images