Paris Jackson To Be Enrolled In Utah’s Diamond Ranch Academy, A School For Troubled Teens, After She Checks Out Of Hospital Following Suicide Bid

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paris jackson-Diamond Ranch
Michael Jackson's daughter Paris attends a ceremony where the singer's shoes and gloves are used to make hand and foot imprints in cement in the courtyard of Hollywood's Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles on January 26, 2012.

Paris Jackson will be moved to a boarding school for troubled youth once she checks out of UCLA Hospital in Los Angeles, British tabloid The Sun reported on Sunday.

The school in Hurricane, Utah, is called the Diamond Ranch Academy, and is a residential treatment center for struggling teens between the ages of 12 and 18, the facility’s website stated.

It is spread across 60 acres and programs at the center last between eight months to 12 months, which should give Paris sufficient time to cope with her problems, a source close to the family told The Sun.

“As far as Paris is concerned she is fine and is ready to go home, but the doctors and her family are not taking any chances,” the source said. “She tried to end her own life and it doesn’t get more serious than that. She was in a terrible state and her family knows it would not take much to tip her over the edge.”

The decision to send Paris to the therapeutic facility was taken by her mother, Debbie Rowe, and grandmother, Katherine Jackson, fearing sudden exposure to social networking sites would cause Jackson to relapse. Paris was rushed to the hospital following a failed suicide bid on June 5.

Reportedly, they do not want Paris to be exposed to the Michael Jackson wrongful death case they have filed against Jackson’s concert promoters, AEG.

The Sun reported that the move to Diamond Ranch Academy will take some time, as the Jacksons are currently putting in proper security measures to protect the 15-year-old and other students at the facility from media attention.

“They know there will be a lot of attention on Paris while she’s in residence and there’s a real danger obsessive fans might try to break in,” the source told The Sun. 

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