UPDATE: 11:35 a.m. EDT – Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders endorsed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s presidential bid Tuesday in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

"I intend to do everything I can to make sure she will be the next president of the United States," Sanders said.

Sanders said his campaign had started a "political revolution to transform America" and that he would continue to fight for a government that represents everyone not "just the one percent."

He emphasized that Clinton was the best candidate to address numerous challenges facing both the world and the U.S.

Original story:

It’s a day presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has long awaited: Democratic rival Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is finally giving her his endorsement.

Clinton and Sanders are scheduled to appear together in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Tuesday at around noon. The event is scheduled from 11:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sanders is expected to throw his support behind Clinton ahead of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia scheduled to start on July 25. A live stream of the New Hampshire event is available here. Sanders is expected to speak first, followed by Clinton, NBC News reported.

Clinton Democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her husband former President Bill Clinton greet supporters during a primary night event on June 7, 2016 in Brooklyn, New York. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The anticipated endorsement has raised numerous questions: Will Sanders immediately suspend his campaign? Is this the end of his message on income inequality during the 2016 election? Will Sanders' supporters rally behind Clinton? Will Sanders head out on the campaign trail to rally Democrats around Clinton?

After a contentious primary season, it is yet to be seen whether Clinton and Sanders will be able to bridge their differences and unite to fight against presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. During the campaign, Sanders said he did not think Clinton was “qualified” to be president.

"I’m not convinced he’s going to spend most of his time campaigning for Hillary Clinton and articulating her views," Jim Manley, a Clinton supporter and Democratic operative told the Washington Post. "I’m concerned he’ll continue talking about his views…He’s been playing Jedi mind games. For every nice word he says here, he takes a couple other back there."

Even ahead of the appearance, it has not been smooth sailing. The Clinton campaign appeared to accidentally post a Sanders attack ad to one of its YouTube channels Monday challenging his views on the Export-Import Bank and highlighting the animosity between the two politicians, the Washington Post reported.

The location of Tuesday’s event also has meaning. Clinton lost New Hampshire to Sanders by 22 percentage points in February in a loss that initially shook her campaign and helped Sanders rise to prominence.

Despite the uncertainty over Sanders’ future role, an email sent to Clinton supporters late Monday, with the subject line “Some big news,” announced the joint appearance and pivoted quickly to mention Trump.

“We’re putting together the strongest campaign this country has ever seen, and it’s a good thing too, because we’ve never faced an opponent like Donald Trump,” the email said.