Child-Free Flying? Scoot Airlines Launches ‘ScootinSilence’ Where Children Under 12 Are Banned

 @nadinedeninnon.deninno@ibtimes.com
on August 21 2013 10:34 AM
Scoot Airlines
Child-free flying? This concept is now a reality on Scoot Airlines thanks to it's new cabin option for travelers called "ScootinSilence" that bans children under the age of 12 in its seats. Reuters

Ever get stuck on an airplane with a crying child? Probably one of the worst experiences ever, right? But imagine if you could avoid children altogether on your next flight?

Scoot Airlines, a division of Singapore Airlines, is making that a possibility with “ScootinSilence,” a new child-free option for travelers that bans kids under the age of 12.

According to the website, passengers flying Scoot Airlines can upgrade to the 41-seat cabin for just $18. The new section, in rows 21 to 25 offers additional legroom as well as no children under 12-years-old.

“Want to Scoot in peace and quiet? Now you can, in our ScootinSilence cabin just behind the ScootBiz cabin!” the website boasts. “Besides the exclusivity and privacy that you'll enjoy in the ScootinSilence cabin as under 12's will be someplace else, you'll also get extra legroom, as each seat is either Super or S-T-R-E-T-C-H, offering 35” pitch – 4 more inches than the standard economy seat!”

With headquarters in Singapore, Scoot Airlines has daily flights to Sydney and five flights a week to the Gold Coast.

The Telegraph reported that Scoot is not the first to introduce child-free flying options. Back in February, Malaysian airline Air Asia X launched “quiet zones” on some flights. These zones prohibit children under 12 to sit in the first seven economy class rows on Airbus A330-300 flights to China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Australia and Nepal. In addition, the “quite zones” have “special ambient lighting” and provide a “more relaxing atmosphere,” according to the Air Asia X website.

Malaysian Airlines also banned babies from first-class on Airbus A380 “superjumbo” aircrafts and Boeing 747s after rampant complaints of crying children.

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