Rock star progressive and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren joined Hillary Clinton on the campaign trail this week, giving rousing speeches in support of the presumptive Democratic nominee for president. But Warren wasn't always Clinton’s biggest fan. 

On Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” Wednesday, host Trevor Noah listed the reasons why Warren could be a key asset to the Clinton campaign. But the comedian also pointed out that before Warren endorsed Clinton, she was one of her biggest critics, repeatedly calling Clinton out in the press for her ties to Wall Street and for catering to big campaign donors instead of constituents. 

“Getting Elizabeth Warren to campaign with Hillary is actually a really big deal,” Noah said. “First of all, Warren is one of the leading voices in the fine art of trolling Donald Trump, and she is also probably one of the country’s top progressive icons today.”

The comedian then played a video of Warren harshly criticizing Clinton in the press, adding if Clinton could successfully bring Warren on board her campaign, then perhaps she does have what it takes to unify the country. 

“She only said those things because she was hungry,” Noah joked of Warren’s previous comments about Clinton. 

Noah did acknowledge that seeing Clinton, the first female presumptive nominee of a major party, and Warren on the same stage was a historic moment. However, Noah took aim at some members of the media, whom he accused of treating Clinton’s campaign with sexism. The comedian played a montage of various news pundits commenting on the vague similarities of the blue suits worn by Clinton and Warren on stage, pointing out the hypocrisy of the bringing attention to “tabloid-level wardrobe minutiae” despite the fact that male politicians are almost always wearing nearly identical black and blue suits. 


Warren endorsed Clinton in early June, becoming the last Democratic leader in Congress to throw her support behind the candidate. Warren is thought to be in the running to be Clinton’s  running mate in the general election.