After years of waiting and speculation, the “Deadpool” origins story is finally being presented to fans correctly on the big screen. With the film promising to do the comic book justice, one key actor in that story is speaking up about his role in the movie and how it shapes the Wade Wilson character into the hero people know and love. 

Prior to his role in “Deadpool,” actor Hugh Scott has been featured in several TV shows under the crime-drama genre such as “CSI,” “NCIS,” “Zero Hour” and “The Closer.” In the new Ryan Reynolds-led movie, he takes on a small yet vital role from the “Deadpool” comic books that many who are familiar with the anti-hero's origins will recognize. He plays David Cunningham, better known to readers of the source material as Worm. 

“I play a character who is a good friend to Wade Wilson/Deadpool during one of the darkest chapters of his life,” Scott told The International Business Times in an interview. “I am there with him and we provide each other with  humor, camaraderie and the chance to see past our immediate circumstances. It's a very complex supporting role and I am excited for audiences to see my turn as Cunningham.”

As previously reported, one of the things that the cast of “Deadpool” believes separates this movie from others in the superhero genre is the fact that it’s made with the fans in mind. To that end, Scott admits that those who read the comic books likely already know how his storyline with Wade Wilson (Reynolds) plays out in the film. 

In the comics, Worm is a fellow resident of the hospice where Wade Wilson goes after being rejected from the Weapon X program. While there, they’re both subject to merciless experimentation and testing from the villain Ajax, played in the movie by Ed Skrein, that eventually result in Deadpool’s powers, but at a pretty grim cost to his friend Worm.

“I definitely think very savvy fans will recognize some of my character from the comic books,” he said. “This movie really is made by fans for ‘Deadpool’ fans, both new and old. I also think adapting comic books into movies allows an opportunity to re-imagine storylines and characters in a way that makes them feel fresh, but doesn’t betray the loyalty of fans. I know the studio gave [director] Tim [Miller] and Ryan the creative freedom to really cater to the legion of ‘Deadpool’ fans and I believe it paid off. There is nothing in the movie that fans might feel is out of place.” 

While making a “Deadpool” movie strictly for fans may sound like a good thing, it can put a terrible strain on the creative process to have so many informed and watchful eyes on a project. Luckily, Scott believes that it only inspired everyone to rise to the occasion in the film's case. 

“I think any actor feels a sense of responsibility to any character they portray. One of the cardinal rules of acting is not to hold your characters in contempt. Luckily for me, my character is a pretty sympathetic guy. I also think the writers did such a tremendous job of re-imagining the character of Deadpool that it made my job much easier in that regard. The work they did on the script and on my scenes, was so strong that I was allowed to trust the moment and be free while shooting.” 

As for the appeal of “Deadpool” to those that aren’t a diehard comic book fan, the actor admits that he wasn’t familiar with the character’s source material before taking on the role. However, that quickly changed once he had to immerse himself in the violent, darkly humorous world of the character. 

“I was aware of Deadpool but cannot qualify myself as a true fan before I booked the role,” Scott confessed. “Now, it’s a different story. I found it impossible not to get sucked into the world and the characters when researching my role. I really love the action and I’m addicted to the morbid and well-placed quips of Wade Wilson/Deadpool. I’m a Deadpool fan for life… There’s no going back.” 

Hugh Scott can be seen in "Deadpool," in theaters on Feb. 12. Fans can also follow him on Twitter @Hugh_Scott1.