Two visitors died after riding on attractions at Disney theme parks late last year, according to a report released Wednesday by a Florida state body charged with monitoring injuries sustained on theme park rides.

According to the report, issued by the Florida Bureau of Fair Rides and cited by the Orlando Sentinel, a 54-year-old woman lost consciousness after riding “Toy Story: Midway Mania” at Disney's Hollywood Studios in October 2014, and a 22-year old woman lost consciousness on “It's a Small World” ride on Christmas Day the same year.

Both subsequently died, though the amount of time that passed between their deaths and when they went on the rides were not specified.

This is the first time that Disney has reported two deaths in a single quarter since 2007, the paper added.

Both rides are comparatively gentle. The ride, “It's A Small World,” involves a slow-moving boat cruise past animated scenes of animatronic dolls illustrating different world cultures, and “Toy Story” involves cars taking guests past an array of 3-D video displays.

"That's just where they happened to be at the time," Jerry Aldrich, an Orlando-based theme park consultant, who dismissed the deaths as coincidental, told the Sentinel. "In 'A Small World,' I wouldn't think that would cause you a spike in blood pressure or anything like that."

In addition to the two deaths, the report also detailed injuries sustained at Florida's theme parks -- a major draw for tourists from around the country and globally -- in the last quarter. It showed that there were non-fatal accidents at Orlando's Walt Disney World, five at Universal Studios Orlando and two at Sea World, the Huffington Post reported.

They included an incident when a British visitor lost two fingertips while riding on the "Pirates of the Caribbean," ride at Walt Disney World, Doctor Disney reported.