Eid Mubarak 2013: Muslims Around The World Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, The End Of Ramadan [PHOTOS]

on August 08 2013 12:29 PM
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Thousands of believers take part in morning prayers to celebrate the first day of Eid-al-Fitr in Moscow August 8, 2013. The Eid al-Fitr festival marks the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Afghan villagers take part in the burial of victims of an explosion in the Ghani Khel district of Nangarhar province August 8, 2013. The bomb planted in an Afghan graveyard killed 14 women and children on Thursday, many of them picnicking at the graveside of a family member during the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, officials said. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Faithful attend prayers for the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, in Palermo August 8, 2013. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    The faithful gather to attend prayers for the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, at the Parc Chanot exhibition centre in Marseille August 8, 2013. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Children ride swings during Eid al-Fitr in the port city of Sidon, southern Lebanon, August 8, 2013. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Fitr to mark the end of Ramadan, the holiest month in the Islamic calendar. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Somali residents dance to tradition tunes while celebrating the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, north of capital Mogadishu August 8, 2013. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi walk with their families in the sit-in area of Rab'a al- Adawiya Square, where they are camping, on the first day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday after the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, in Cairo August 8, 2013. Islamist supporters of Mursi began marching to demand his restoration on Thursday after the military-led authorities that removed him held off from carrying out a threat to clear protest sit-ins by force. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    A Muslim family greets each other after attending Eid al-Fitr prayers near Sunda Kelapa port in Jakarta August 8, 2013. Indonesia, which has the world's largest Muslim population, celebrates Eid al-Fitr with mass prayers and family visits to mark the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan. Reuters
  • Eid al-Fitr 2013
    Workers prepare traditional cookies for sale in Jerusalem's Old City ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, August 7, 2013. Reuters
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Muslims around the world celebrated with prayer and food during the Eid al-Fitr festival, marking the end of Ramadan 2013 or the Islamic holy month of fasting. The annual holiday, which lasts for three days, marks of the anniversary of the Quran being revealed to the Prophet Muhammad.

The three-day festival, sometimes abbreviated as “Eid” or “Eid Mubarak,” marks the end of the month-long fasting during Ramadan, which began on July 8 this year. Eid al Fitr begins after the new crescent moon appears and falls on the first day of Shawwal, the tenth month in the Islamic lunar calendar typically when Muslims celebrate unity. During Eid, many join in Islamic prayer, known as salat while saying "Allahu Akbar," or "God is Great" and feasting.

Ramadan is an annual celebration for Muslims held during the ninth month of the 12-month Islamic calendar, starting after the sighting of the new moon. The holy month began this year on Monday, July 8, at sunset, or “rukyah,” when the moon is spotted. The celebration lasts for 29 or 30 days until the next new moon appears, which happened on Wednesday, Aug. 7. The month of fasting is celebrated by more than 1.5 billion Muslims around the world, including in the U.S., where there are nearly 2.6 million Muslims, according to the Pew Research Center.

The purpose of Ramadan is to focus on spirituality, praying more often and withholding any acts of violence during the fast. Many Muslims around the world are expected to participate -- with the exception of the elderly, sick and pregnant -- by wishing each other "Ramadan Kareem" or "Ramadan Mubarak."

For the end of Ramadan, Muslims celebrate Ed al-Fitr, which translated from Arabic into “breaking the fast.” Muslim families will exchange gives, sit down for meals and pray together for three days this Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

Traditional greetings during Eid al-Fitr are “Eid Mubarak,” which means "Blessed Eid," and “Eid Said,” meaning "Happy Eid." Muslims also donate food, called “Zakat al-Fitr” or “charity of breaking the fast,” so that the poor can also celebrate the holiday.

During Ramadan, Muslims are expected to refrain from food and drink and abstain from smoking and sex each day during the celebration from dawn to dusk as one of the five pillars of Islam. The breaking of the fast, or iftaar, begins at dusk by eating dates during the month-long period.  Some Muslims have slightly different variations and have broader definitions of practices during Ramadan.

The month-long fasting marks the anniversary of the Quran being revealed to the Prophet Mohammed.