Extreme Foods People Eat Around The World [PHOTOS]

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  • Urine soaked hard-boiled eggs
    51-year-old vendor Ge Yaohua (R) passes a bag of hard-boiled eggs cooked in boys' urine to a customer holding her baby on a street in Dongyang, Zhejiang province March 26, 2012. It's the end of a school day in the eastern Chinese city of Dongyang, and eager parents collect their children after a hectic day of primary school. But that's just the start of busy times for dozens of egg vendors across the city, deep in coastal Zhejiang province, who ready themselves to cook up a unique springtime snack favoured by local residents. Picture taken March 26, 2012. Reuters
  • Slaughtered Rats For Sale
    A man displays a rat to be slaughtered for sale at in Canh Nau village, 40 km (25 miles) west of Hanoi December 25, 2011. Canh Nau is known as rat meat village where people eat rats as well as other kinds of meat from animals such as pigs, cows, chickens. One kilogram of slaughtered rats costs 80,000 dong ($3.80). Rats were eaten as a result of poverty in the past but now they are eaten at the end of every month of the lunar calendar as a special dish and local media reported that an average of a hundred kilograms of rat are sold at the village per day. Reuters
  • Slaughtered Rats For Sale
    Slaughtered rats are displayed for sale at the market of Canh Nau village, 40 km (25 miles) west of Hanoi December 25, 2011. Canh Nau is known as rat meat village where people eat rats as well as other kinds of meat from animals such as pigs, cows and chickens. One kilogram of slaughtered rats costs 80,000 dong ($3.80). Rats were eaten as a result of poverty in the past but now they are eaten at the end of every month of the lunar calendar as a special dish and local media reported that an average of a hundred kilograms of rat are sold at the village per day. Reuters
  • Slaughtered Dogs for Sale
    Dogs wait to be slaughtered in a cage for sale as food in Duong Noi village, outside Hanoi December 16, 2011. While animal rights activists have condemned eating dog meat as cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some Vietnamese, as well in some other Asian countries. Duong Noi is well-known as a dog-meat village, where hundreds of dogs are killed each day for sale as popular traditional food. Dog-eating as a custom is rooted in Vietnam and was developed as a result of poverty. One kilogram of dog meat costs about 130,000 dongs ($6.2) Reuters
  • Slaughtered Dogs for Sale
    A vendor cuts slaughtered dogs for sale at his roadside stall in Duong Noi village, outside Hanoi December 16, 2011. While animal rights activists have condemned eating dog meat as cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some Vietnamese, as well in some other Asian countries. Duong Noi is well-known as a dog-meat village, where hundreds of dogs are killed each day for sale as popular traditional food. Dog-eating as a custom is rooted in Vietnam and was developed as a result of poverty. One kilogram of dog meat costs about 130,000 dongs ($6.2). Reuters
  • Raw Camel Liver
    Heads of slaughtered camels are seen on the ground at Tamboal village market in Al Jazeera April 16, 2011. According to the Sudanese Ministry of Animals Resources in 2003, the country produced about 72,000 to 81,000 tonnes of camel meat annually from 1996 to 2002. Reuters
  • Raw Camel Liver
    A woman prepares a dish of camel liver at her shop in Tamboal village market in Al Jazeera April 16, 2011. According to the Sudanese Ministry of Animals Resources in 2003, the country produced about 72,000 to 81,000 tonnes of camel meat annually from 1996 to 2002. Reuters
  • Cobra Meat
    A worker holds cobra meat after the snakes have been stripped of their skins, at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta Reuters
  • Cobra Meat Burger
    A chef prepares a cobra meat burger at a Chinese restaurant in the ancient city of Yogyakarta April 1, 2011. Snake hunters catch about 1,000 cobras from Yogyakarta, Central Java and East Java provinces each week to harvest their meat for burgers, priced at 10,000 rupiah ($1.15) each, as well as satay and other dishes. Some customers said they believe cobra meat can cure skin diseases and asthma, and increase sexual virility Reuters
  • Roasted Rat
    San Smey, 4, eats a piece of roasted rat in the provincial town of Battambang, 290 km (181 miles) northwest of the capital Phnom Penh February 19, 2004. With meat-eaters shying away from chicken because of the deadly bird flu virus rampant across Asia, sales of rat are rocketing in the impoverished southeast Asian nation Reuters
  • Turtle Meat
    An indigenous Miskito woman sells turtle meat at a town market in Puerto Cabezas, along Nicaragua's Caribbean coast August 25, 2010. Around five hundred turtles are sold for food per month in the port. The going rate for turtle meat is approximately $1.10 per pound. Reuters
  • Roasted Cat
    A cook cuts pieces of roasted cats inside the kitchen of the restaurant Le Zoo chez Felix which serves bushmeat in Abidjan April 11, 2008. Wild animal meat, called bushmeat in Africa, is a traditional part of the diet in many countries of the continent. From Ivory Coast in the west through Equatorial Guinea to Kenya in the east, poaching to feed the bushmeat market is rampant and it is threatening entire species, including man's closest relatives, the great apes Reuters
  • Ox and Dog Penis Dish
    A Chinese woman eats from an ox and dog penis dish at the Guolizhuang "strength in the pot" penis restaurant in China's capital Beijing March 3, 2006. The restaurant offers more than 30 types of animal penises served in a Chinese hotpot style. According to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, the penis of certain animals is full of nutrients which brings men energy. And because it contains gelatine albumen, it is said to have excellent cosmetic effects for women, especially beneficial for the skin Reuters
  • Roasted Cuy
    Andean women display a dish of roasted cuy during a guinea pig festival in Huacho, northern Lima, July 20, 2008. The one-day festival includes an animal show and a food and fashion contest which features the guinea pig, native to the Andes. Cuy, a traditional fried or roasted guinea pig dish, dates back at least fifteen centuries to pre-Incan times. Reuters
  • Frog Drink
    Bertha Piranes drops a skinned frog into a blender to make a drink at a market in San Juan de Lurigancho, Lima. The drink, popular with working-class Peruvians, is believed to cure illnesses ranging from fatigue to sexual impotency. Reuters
  • Raw Blood Dish
    A raw blood dish is displayed with cooked entrails at a restaurant in Hanoi April 28, 2009. Frozen pudding from fresh duck or pig blood is a popular dish in the Southeast Asian country although duck blood is less consumed following bird flu outbreaks that have killed at least 55 Vietnamese since late 2003. In Vietnam, there appeared to be a degree of confusion towards swine flu which is not in fact linked to pigs alone -- but an assortment of swine, human and avian viruses. One bowl of raw blood costs VND10,000 ($0.55). Reuters
  • Fermented Scorpion Wine
    A Thai man poses while drinking a glass of rice wine with a scorpion in the village of Baan Niyomchai in Lopburi province, about 250 km (155 miles) north of Bangkok. Villagers there are fond of wine fermented with scorpions, believing the insects can cure various diseases and improve sexual potency Reuters
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All over the world, people of all races consume some of the strangest things imaginable. Here is a list of the most repulsive meals that people eat, considering that the least disgusting item on the menu is urine-soaked boiled egg, a delicacy in China.

Consequently, quite a few countries face a lot of animal rights issues for the immoral killing of normal and endangered animals to satiate their appetite for these rather bizarre eating habits.

Click start to begin the slideshow and have a look at the most strange, repelling and extremely disgusting meals ever.

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