Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons stunned fans in a recent interview by saying that gay marriage might lead to marriage between fathers and sons.

In an interview with HuffPost Live, the “Borgias” actor said he didn’t “have a strong feeling either way” on the issue, but wondered that if same-sex marriage was legalized, “Could a father not marry his son?”

When Josh Zepps, the Huffington Post interviewer, countered that incest laws prohibit such unions, Irons said, “it’s not incest between men.” “Incest is there to protect us from inbreeding, but men don't breed,” Irons reasoned.

"It seems to me that now they're fighting for the name," Irons said, differentiating between gay marriage and civil unions. "I worry that it means somehow we debase, or we change, what marriage is. I just worry about that."

Irons stressed again that he doesn't "have a strong feeling either way" on the matter, but wishes "everybody who's living with one other person the best of luck in the world, because it's fantastic."

"Living with another animal, whether it be a husband or a dog, is great," he continued. "It's lovely to have someone to love. I don't think sex matters at all. What it's called doesn't matter at all."

Irons’ comments provoked a wave of anger across Twitter from users who accused him of demonstrating ignorance on the subject. “#jeremyirons has gone from being one of my favourite actors, to one of my least favourite people #dissapointed” @louis_c_martin wrote.

“Any fathers out there now planning to exploit gay marriage laws to marry their sons?” @TheBenMcPherson7h tweeted.

Gay Scottish actor Alan Cumming also condemned Irons’ remarks, tweeting, “I hate when people say they don't have strong feelings about something then proceed to spew offensive and ignorant ones.”

Irons’ weren’t the only provocative developments on the gay marriage front this week. President Ronald Reagan's daughter, Patti Davis, said her father -- the hero to conservatives who died in 2004 -- would have supported same-sex marriage.

According to Politico, Davis made the remarks during an interview on the YouTube show “Gwissues” on Wednesday, telling viewers that her father “was a very tolerant person.”

“He did not have prejudices against gay people,” Davis asserted. (Those who remember his administration's indifference to AIDS might beg to differ.) In fact, Davis said Reagan’s conservative views would have prevented him from opposing same-sex marriage.

“I don’t think he would stand in the way of it, at all. I don’t think he would stand in the way of two people wanting to make a commitment to one another,” Davis said. “What difference does it make to anybody else’s life? I also think because he wanted government out of peoples’ lives, he would not understand the intrusion of government banning such a thing. This is not what he would have thought government should be doing.”

Davis, who often had stormy relations with her parents and was labeled the "black sheep" of the family during the Reagan presidency, recently self-published an e-book "Till Human Voices Wake Us," described as a lesbian love story.