Kate Middleton’s wedding gown by British fashion house Alexander McQueen is facing legal proceedings by English bridal designer. Designer Christine Kendall who has her studio in Hertfordshire, England, has sued the British fashion house for breach of copyright with a claim filed at the Intellectual Property Enterprise Court in London. She alleged that the Duchess of Cambridge’s wedding gown was inspired by her sketches.

According to a report in The Sunday Times of London, Kendall’s lawyer said her designs were “unfairly taken and copied” by the fashion house. The dress, designed by creative director Sarah Burton and handmade in the McQueen studio in London, was kept a secret until Kate appeared at Westminster Abbey on April 29, 2011. The designer sent 1950s-themed sketches to Clarence House months before the wedding and received a letter of gratitude from Prince William and Prince Harry in January 2011.

However, Kendall’s solicitor clarified that the claim was not against the duchess or the palace. A spokesman for McQueen reportedly said the house is “utterly baffled” by the legal claim. “Christine Kendall first approached us, at Alexander McQueen, almost four years ago, when we were clear with her that any suggestion Sarah Burton’s design of the royal wedding dress was copied from her designs was nonsense. Sarah Burton never saw any of Ms. Kendall’s designs or sketches and did not know of Ms. Kendall before Ms. Kendall got in touch with us — some 13 months after the wedding,” said the statement.

The fashion house said that the designer’s claim was “ridiculous.” In 2012, Burton was awarded an OBE, or The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, for services to the fashion industry at Buckingham Palace.

The row began in December 2013 when Kendall said that without her sketches the royal wedding dress would not have looked as it did. Kate’s bridal gown featured lace applique floral detail and was made of ivory and white satin gazar. The skirt resembled "an opening flower" with white satin gazar arches and pleats and the train measured nine foot.