Matthew Barnett, 19, pleaded guilty Thursday to endangering the welfare of a child. The misdemeanor charge came two years after he was accused of raping 16-year-old Daisy Coleman in January 2012.

Thursday’s hearing marked another twist in a case that has outraged people across the nation, even prompting the activist group Anonymous to become involved in raising awareness about the incident. Barnett also apologized to Daisy Coleman and her family on Thursday during the short hearing, KCTV reports.

Barnett’s sentence includes two years probation, and he must pay $1,800 in restitution to Coleman's family. The money will be used to help provide mental health counseling for Coleman. As we reported earlier, Matthew Barnett, then 17, was accused of raping then-14-year-old Daisy Coleman on Jan. 7, 2012, at a party in the basement of his home. The Maryville High School football player, who was a senior at the time, brought Coleman and her 13-year-old friend to his home, where Coleman says she was raped after she blacked out from drinking alcohol.

In March 2012, assault charges against Barnett were dropped by prosecutor Robert Price. But the case was reopened in October 2013 when a special prosecutor was appointed to review the incident. In the last few days leading up to the Barnett's hearing, a large amount of updates have occured regarding the case. Below we’ve gathered five important things to know about the incident and Barnett's sentence. 

1. The Special Prosecutor Says There Was Insufficient Evidence To Pursue The Assault Charges

According to the special prosecutor in the case, Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker, she did not file sexual assault charges due to there being a lack of evidence to pursue the charge. She says she also took into account the large amount of unrest the case has caused in Maryville, KCTV reports.

2. Matthew Barnett’s Sentence Carries Strict Terms

The conditions of Barnett’s two-year probation include not consuming alcohol, being near alcohol or going to an establishment that sells alcohol. He must avoid any contact with Coleman and her family and perform 100 hours of community service. Drug testing and an apology he gave on Thursday were also part of the plea deal. He could have faced up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine on the charge of second-degree endangering the welfare of a child.

3. Anonymous Is Voicing Anger Over The Ruling

Several Twitter accounts that claim to be associated with Anonymous are expressing disappointment and anger over the outcome of the case. Just this week, Daisy Coleman’s mother requested increased support from the group that rallied around Daisy and her family when the case first gained national attention last fall.

4. Daisy Coleman Continues To Recover From Her Suicide Attempt

The Missouri teen was hospitalized early Monday after a suicide attempt -- her second since she came forward with the rape allegations. In a post to her Facebook account, Melinda Coleman said her daughter Daisy Coleman tried to take her own life on Sunday. Melinda said Daisy attempted suicide after being "terrorized" on social media by teenagers after she attended a party over the weekend.

5. Coleman Says She Will Continue To Fight

Special Prosecutor Baker read a statement from Daisy on Thursday in which the teen vowed to stay strong and offered her appreciation to her supporters: “Today I am grateful … I am ready to move forward. To all of those who supported me, I promise what happened on January 8 of 2012 will not define me forever.”