McDonald’s Employee Tips: ‘McResource’ Reportedly Tells Staff To Break Food Into Pieces To Stay Full [VIDEO]

McDonald’s might want to think about their human resources, or rather, “McResource,” team after the company's struggling employees were reportedly advised to break their food into smaller pieces when they ate to stay full longer. The fast-food giant’s employee website, which is where staff members said they are advised to go if they’re looking for information on how to manage their health, stress or finances, is now under scrutiny for some of its advice after certain people aren’t lovin’ the tips Micky D’s has to offer its staff.

There’s a video from Low Pay Is Not OK, which states that McDonald’s tells its employees to sing their stress away and take two vacations a year to help them decrease their risk of a heart attack. Sounds pretty crazy, right? Well, the video can be seen here or check it out at the bottom of this article.

But that’s not the only advice McResource has to offer. If there are any unwanted and unopened holiday gifts, they can be sold for some “quick cash” -- because who doesn’t love auctioning off presents from loved ones?

While it would seem to many that these tips aren't the least bit helpful, McDonald’s maintains they were taken out of context. “This is an attempt by an outside organization to undermine a well-intended employee assistance resource website by taking isolated portions out of context," the fast-food company said in a statement quoted by NBC Chicago.

"The McResource website has helped countless employees by providing them with a variety of information and resources on topics ranging from health and wellness to stress and financial management. The website also includes some rotating ‘quick tips’ and while we recognize that some of these could be taken out of context, the vast majority of the resources and information on the site are based on credible outside experts and well-published advice."

McDonald’s workers made headlines in July when they demanded their pay to be increased from $7.25 to $15 an hour and asked for better benefits.

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