Men may have a greater chance of being relieved from pain by smoking marijuana, according to a new report.

During a research study conducted by Drug and Alcohol Dependence, after smoking joints men turned out to be less affected by pain than women. The study asked 42 male and female recreational weed smokers to dunk one hand in extremely cold water for as long as they could possibly bare. The experiment was conducted twice – once after smoking marijuana and once after smoking a placebo.

Results revealed men were significantly less sensitive to pain and also more able to tolerate pain compared to women. However, women were still able to tolerate more pain under the influence of marijuana, but the substance didn’t necessarily relieve them from the pain.

According to Columbia University Medical Center’s Associate Professor of Clinical Neurobiology Ziva Cooper, who was one of the researchers involved in the experiment, the study will only lead to more important research regarding the different experiences male and female cannabis users face while under the influence of marijuana, especially in regards to addressing men and women’s needs as it relates to marijuana-based medicine.

"This study underscores the importance of including both men and women in clinical trials aimed at understanding the potential therapeutic and negative effects of cannabis, particularly as more people use cannabinoid products for recreational or medical purposes," Cooper told UPI.

Although the study proved men felt less pain after puffing the plant, Cooper said that doesn’t necessarily close the door on women’s need for medical weed, which is something more and more retailers – like Whoopi Goldberg’s pot-induced salves and edibles and FORIA’s weed tampons –have been exploring to aid in women's menstrual pain relief.

“We think the reason why we're seeing this differential effect, where males in our lab see this pain-relieving effect and females didn't, might be due to the fact that we're dealing with really heavy cannabis smokers," she said during an interview with Broadly. "Another thing to keep in mind that this is not a blanket statement about cannabis or cannabinoids, or their pain-relieving effects in women."

“Our study indicates that future research should really make a strong effort to include females," she continued. “There's evidence that they do differ in this respect, and it's important to understand the variables that contribute to their differences."