Mountain Lion Eats Dachshund In Front Of Owner In Colorado Springs

 @jiillx
on March 21 2013 9:21 AM
Cougar_closeup
A head keeper at an animal sanctuary in Oregon was fatally attacked by a cougar over the weekend. Wikimedia Commons

A Colorado dog owner received the shock of his life last week, when a mountain lion attacked and ate his pet dachshund right in front of him.

A Denver-area CBS affiliate reported the incident occurred on March 13 in a gated community on the southwest side of Colorado Springs. The dog's owner said they were out for a walk when a mountain lion sprang out of the bushes, snatched the dog away from him, and devoured the animal.

“The mountain lion came out from some bushes that are in close proximity to the street that he was walking on, grabbed the Dachshund, and tucked and pulled hard enough to yank the leash out of his hand,” Michael Seraphin, a Public Information Officer for Colorado Parks and Wildlife said.

After the attack on the dog, the big cat was deemed a threat and Seraphin said officials decided "the best course of action would be to put it down." 

The mountain lion was trapped and later euthanized. The remains of the small dachshund were found inside its stomach following a necropsy examination in Fort Collins, KOAA reported.

Residents said similar attacks have been happening for years.

“We know there are mountain lions in the area, there have been other attacks several years ago,” one resident told KOAA. “Our backyard neighbor, a mountain lion climbed a tree and jumped onto her deck and took her dog.”

Residents added that while most of the mountain lion attacks have been limited to deer and small pets, there have also been attacks on people. In December, a female jogging through Cheyenne Mountain State Park accidentally stumbled upon a mountain lion eating a deer carcass. Lindsey Grewe said when the cat saw her, it gave chase, but eventually backed off and resumed eating its prey.

“I really thought he was going to attack me,” Grewe said. “I had visions that I was going to get eaten.”

Park and wildlife officials cautioned residents to refrain from running or making sudden movements if they come across a mountain lion and advised them to back away slowly or try to make themselves seem larger to intimidate the animal. 

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