On The Road (TBA):  Based on Jack Kerouac's 1952 novel, the film follows a group of young artists on a road trip. It stars such box-office bait as Kristen Stewart and Viggo Mortensen, and you'll recognize such actors as Garret Hedlund (Tron) and Elizabeth Moss (Mad Men). Other stars include Kirsten Dunst and acclaimed British actor Sam Riley. The classic beatnik tale has never been adapted for the big screen until now, so the film has a great deal to live up to. 

 

Jeff Who Lives At Home (March 16): Who could resist a film starring Jason Segel, Ed Helms, and Susan Sarandon? Segel stars as the title character who (surprise) lives at home with his mother (Sarandon) and spends his days pondering life. His brother (Helms) isn't thrilled about Jeff's hermit lifestyle and the two clash immensely.  Over the course of the story, the three must learn to accept one another, flaws and all.

Natural Selection (March 16): A quirky and highly original dramedy, this film (starring The Hangover's Rachel Harris) is a rare gem. Not only is the plot brilliant, it deals with several themes that are rarely explored on-screen, such as sexual repression. It's bold, hilarious, and raises some seriously good questions.

The Hunte(April 6): Willem Dafoe stars as a mercenary hired to kill the last known Tasmanian Tiger. A constant loner who seems comforted by the Australian wilderness, he grows attached to a struggling family. This beautifully shot film is a rousing exploration of someone taking a second shot at life (literally and figuratively).

Marley (April 20): Academy Award winning director, Kevin Macdonald has done something remarkable. His striking documentary captures the life and beliefs of music legend Bob Marley while putting forth a brilliant narrative structure. The film contains rare footage, unheard tracks, and interviews with those that lived the Rastafarian dream.

4:44 Last Day On Earth (March 23): Willem Dafoe stars in this end-of-the-world drama. It centers on a New York City couple attempting to enjoy their final moments. A haunting portrait of human behavior, the film will likely stay with you for days.