Update, Oct. 28, 8:50 pm ET: The announcement by FBI Director James Comey of the existence of previously unknown Hillary Clinton emails roiled the  presidential election, 11 days before the vote.

"Perhaps, finally, justice will done," said Donald Trump at a New Hampshire rally.

Clinton held a brief news conference Friday evening to respond to the disclosure.  “We are calling on the F.B.I to release all the information that it has,” she said.  “Let’s get it out.”

The emails surfaced as part of an ongoing investigation of Anthony Weiner, a former New York congressman, for sending text messages to an underage girl. Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin, is a longtime aide to Clinton.

Original story: The FBI said it had not found any reason to charge Hillary Clinton with a crime as a result of her use of a private email server while she was secretary of state. But it appears they are going to keep looking. 

The FBI is reopening its investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, who is the chairman of the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, tweeted Friday that FBI Director James Comey told him that the bureau had found additional emails that were pertinent to the case and were this reopening the investigation. A subsequent statement from the FBI revealed that the new emails turned up while the FBI was investigating a separate case. 

"Although the FBI cannot yet assess whether or not this material may be significant, and I cannot predict how long it will take us to complete this additional work, I believe it is important to update your committees about our efforts in light of my previous testimony," wrote Comey. 

Comey and the FBI have opted not to share any details about the content of the new emails, but did say that the emails were unrelated to WikiLeaks' release of emails from Clinton's presidential campaign. 

Comey held a hearing in July to announce that the investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server was concluded and that they had found no reason to charge Clinton with a crime, although he did describe her treatment of classified information as "reckless."

"I think she was extremely careless. I think she was negligent — that I could establish," Comey told the House Oversight and Government Reform panel. "What we can't establish is that she acted with the necessary criminal intent."

Comey's letter will no doubt have reverberations in the presidential election. Democrats in Congress immediately accused Comey of launching a partisan investigation 11 days before the election and caving to pressure from Republicans, while GOP nominee Donald Trump seized the opportunity to criticize his opponent. 

"Hillary Clinton's corruption is on a scale that we have never seen before. We must not let her take her criminal scheme into the Oval Office," Trump said at a rally in New Hampshire Friday. "I am happy that the FBI and the Department of Justice have now decided to have the courage to right the horrible mistake that they made."

The Clinton campaign has not yet responded to the news.