Who Voted Against The 2013 Violence Against Women Act? Congressional Roll Call On Reauthorization Bill

  @ConnorASheetsc.sheets@ibtimes.com on February 28 2013 3:00 PM
US Congress
The U.S. capitol building in Washington, D.C. Reuters

The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, or VAWA, has been passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, sending the bill to the White House for President Barack Obama to sign.

The House passed the bill Thursday by a vote of 286-138. Every House Democrat voted in favor of the bill, while all of the 138 votes against it were cast by Republicans, though 87 GOP Representatives did vote "yea." The Senate passed the bill on Feb. 12 by a vote of 78-22, with all 22 "nay" votes coming from Republican senators.

The congressional roll call for the vote on the bill to reauthorize this historic piece of legislation will be studied by a range of organizations and individuals in the coming days, as women's advocacy groups, feminists and folks who disagree with the bill alike seek to figure out which members of Congress went on the record on both sides of the important issues at heart of the bill.

The House of Representatives' Office of the Clerk told the International Business Times via phone at 2:15 p.m. Thursday that the official House roll call of the vote had not yet been compiled for release to media, but a number of sources have compiled lists of who voted against the bill. This story will be updated when the official roll call is made public.

The version of the bill that passed both houses of Congress was the original Senate version of the bill, which established more far-reaching protections for domestic violence victims than a House version introduced Friday. Efforts to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act had been stalled in the Republican-led House for more than a year before Thursday.

The House version of the bill, which, to reiterate, is not the one headed to Obama's desk, was criticized by many Democrats and various advocacy groups because it would have narrowed its protections for LGBT victims of domestic abuse by removing “sexual orientation" and "gender identity" from a list of "underserved populations" that face barriers to receiving victim services, according to the New York Times.

Scroll to the end of this article to read a full summary of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, which is the official name of the bill that passed both houses of Congress. Click here for the full text of the bill.

Below is a list of the last names of the 138 Republican members of the House who voted against the Senate version of the extension of the Violence Against Women Act that was passed by the House of Representatives on Thursday (known as H.R. 11), as compiled by the Atlantic Wire:

Aderholt

Amash

Bachmann

Barton

Bentivolio

Bilirakis

Bishop (UT)

Black

Blackburn

Bonner

Brady (TX)

Bridenstine

Brooks (AL)

Broun (GA)

Burgess

Campbell

Cantor

Carter

Cassidy

Chabot

Chaffetz

Collins (GA)

Conaway

Cotton

Crawford

Culberson

DeSantis

DesJarlais

Duncan (SC)

Duncan (TN)

Ellmers

Fincher

Fleischmann

Fleming

Flores

Forbes

Fortenberry

Foxx

Franks (AZ)

Garrett

Gingrey (GA)

Gohmert

Goodlatte

Gosar

Gowdy

Graves (GA)

Graves (MO)

Griffin (AR)

Griffith (VA)

Guthrie

Hall

Harris

Hartzler

Hastings (WA)

Hensarling

Holding

Hudson

Huelskamp

Huizenga (MI)

Hultgren

Hurt

Johnson (OH)

Jones

Jordan

Kelly

King (IA)

Kingston

Labrador

LaMalfa

Lamborn

Lankford

Latta

Long

Lucas

Luetkemeyer

Lummis

Marchant

Marino

Massie

McCaul

McClintock

Meadows

Mica

Miller (FL)

Mullin

Mulvaney

Murphy (PA)

Neugebauer

Noem

Nunnelee

Olson

Palazzo

Perry

Petri

Pittenger

Pitts

Pompeo

Posey

Price (GA)

Radel

Ribble

Rice (SC)

Roby

Roe (TN)

Rogers (AL)

Rogers (KY)

Rohrabacher

Rooney

Roskam

Ross

Rothfus

Salmon

Scalise

Schweikert

Scott, Austin

Sensenbrenner

Sessions

Smith (NE)

Smith (NJ)

Smith (TX)

Southerland

Stewart

Stockman

Stutzman

Thornberry

Wagner

Walberg

Weber (TX)

Wenstrup

Westmoreland

Whitfield

Williams

Wilson (SC)

Wittman

Wolf

Womack

Woodall

Yoho

And here's the breakdown by state of the full Senate roll call vote on legislation to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (known as S. 47) which took place Feb. 12, as compiled by the Associated Press:

ALABAMA

Sessions (R), No; Shelby (R), Yes.

ALASKA

Begich (D), Yes; Murkowski (R), Yes.

ARIZONA

Flake (R), Yes; McCain (R), Yes.

ARKANSAS

Boozman (R), No; Pryor (D), Yes.

CALIFORNIA

Boxer (D), Yes; Feinstein (D), Yes.

COLORADO

Bennet (D), Yes; Udall (D), Yes.

CONNECTICUT

Blumenthal (D), Yes; Murphy (D), Yes.

DELAWARE

Carper (D), Yes; Coons (D), Yes.

FLORIDA

Nelson (D), Yes; Rubio (R), No.

GEORGIA

Chambliss (R), Yes; Isakson (R), Yes.

HAWAII

Hirono (D), Yes; Schatz (D), Yes.

IDAHO

Crapo (R), Yes; Risch (R), No.

ILLINOIS

Durbin (D), Yes; Kirk (R), Yes.

INDIANA

Coats (R), Yes; Donnelly (D), Yes.

IOWA

Grassley (R), No; Harkin (D), Yes.

KANSAS

Moran (R), Yes; Roberts (R), No.

KENTUCKY

McConnell (R), No; Paul (R), No.

LOUISIANA

Landrieu (D), Yes; Vitter (R), Yes.

MAINE

Collins (R), Yes; King (I), Yes.

MARYLAND

Cardin (D), Yes; Mikulski (D), Yes.

MASSACHUSETTS

Cowan (D), Yes; Warren (D), Yes.

MICHIGAN

Levin (D), Yes; Stabenow (D), Yes.

MINNESOTA

Franken (D), Yes; Klobuchar (D), Yes.

MISSISSIPPI

Cochran (R), Yes; Wicker (R), Yes.

MISSOURI

Blunt (R), No; McCaskill (D), Yes.

MONTANA

Baucus (D), Yes; Tester (D), Yes.

NEBRASKA

Fischer (R), Yes; Johanns (R), No.

NEVADA

Heller (R), Yes; Reid (D), Yes.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Ayotte (R), Yes; Shaheen (D), Yes.

NEW JERSEY

Lautenberg (D), Yes; Menendez (D), Yes.

NEW MEXICO

Heinrich (D), Yes; Udall (D), Yes.

NEW YORK

Gillibrand (D), Yes; Schumer (D), Yes.

NORTH CAROLINA

Burr (R), Yes; Hagan (D), Yes.

NORTH DAKOTA

Heitkamp (D), Yes; Hoeven (R), Yes.

OHIO

Brown (D), Yes; Portman (R), Yes.

OKLAHOMA

Coburn (R), No; Inhofe (R), No.

OREGON

Merkley (D), Yes; Wyden (D), Yes.

PENNSYLVANIA

Casey (D), Yes; Toomey (R), Yes.

RHODE ISLAND

Reed (D), Yes; Whitehouse (D), Yes.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Graham (R), No; Scott (R), No.

SOUTH DAKOTA

Johnson (D), Yes; Thune (R), No.

TENNESSEE

Alexander (R), Yes; Corker (R), Yes.

TEXAS

Cornyn (R), No; Cruz (R), No.

UTAH

Hatch (R), No; Lee (R), No.

VERMONT

Leahy (D), Yes; Sanders (I), Yes.

VIRGINIA

Kaine (D), Yes; Warner (D), Yes.

WASHINGTON

Cantwell (D), Yes; Murray (D), Yes.

WEST VIRGINIA

Manchin (D), Yes; Rockefeller (D), Yes.

WISCONSIN

Baldwin (D), Yes; Johnson (R), No.

WYOMING

Barrasso (R), No; Enzi (R), No.

The Congressional Research Service provided the following summary of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013:

"Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 - Amends the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (VAWA) to add or expand definitions of several terms used in such Act.

Modifies or expands grant conditions under such Act, including requirements relating to: (1) nondisclosure of personally identifying information or other client information, (2) information sharing between grantees and subgrantees, (3) civil rights and nondiscrimination, (4) audits, and (5) nonprofit organizations.

Requires the Office on Violence Against Women of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to establish a biennial conferral process with state and tribal coalitions, technical assistance providers, and other key stakeholders on the administration of grants and related matters.

Requires the Attorney General to authorize in writing expenditures for DOJ conferences that exceed $20,000."

 

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