Laura May, wife of Shaun May didn’t see it coming. In a remarkably off-beat surprise, Shaun May, 34, asked his wife Laura May to close her eyes and count down from ten to zero is when he stabbed her in the throat with a kitchen knife, narrowly missing her vital arteries. 

May is now on trial for the attempted murder of his wife under the Maidstone Crown Court, the U.K. The court heard that the husband plunged a knife on his wife’s throat on October 9 last year while she expected a gift of some kind.

May, of Tunbridge Wells, Kent, owned up to the crime which he committed after being fired from his job last year. He further confessed to the court that he would kill himself immediately after he landed the knife down her throat.

"I said yes and he told me to close my eyes, which I did. He told me to lay on my back, which I did and he placed something over my eyes. I thought it was a tea towel. "He then started counting down from ten... nine... eight... seven... five... four... three... then two... four... two... three. I was getting annoyed. He did these two or three times. He never reached zero," The Sun quoted Laura as saying.

Laura went on to add, “I said to him 'This had better be a puppy' because we had talked about having one but he said 'It's not a puppy. Then it was just silent and I suddenly felt a pressure on my shoulder. I thought an animal had been thrown on me, something was clawing at me.” I shouted, 'This isn't real.' 'This is real.' He sounded so calm."

Laura realized that she had been stabbed as May appeared holding two knives one of which he said he would use to kill himself over mortgage repayment fears.

When inquired upon his crime, May told police that it was “a sobering moment”.

Prosecutor Robin Griffiths told the court, in view of the severity of the injuries, that it was sheer luck Laura escaped death.

The couple had just returned from a holiday in Korea before the incident took place. Griffiths told the court it was a good relationship and they hardly fought with each other.

Some have suggested that a Supreme Court case on patents could affect prescription drug prices, but legal experts say that's unlikely. Some have suggested that a Supreme Court case on patents could affect prescription drug prices, but legal experts say that's unlikely. Above, the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, March 16, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Jim Bourg