Belly button shaping procedures are the latest trend to surface from the cosmetic surgery realm, doctors say.

The surgery trend, which is also known formally as umbilicoplasty, is expected to be among the most popular operations requested by patients in 2018. Individuals that undergo the procedure have asked to have their new belly buttons modeled after stars like Jessica Simpson and model Emily Ratajkowski, according to The Sun.

"The belly button is a very important cosmetic feature of the stomach," Darren Smith, a board-certified plastic surgeon working in New York, told Allure. "I am seeing an increase in patient interest in belly button aesthetics."

The procedure comes in three forms: an umbilicoplasty, umbilical hernia repair and a standard tummy tuck. An umbilicoplasty modifies the size and shape of a belly button, whereas the umbilical hernia repair transforms an outward-facing belly button into an inward-facing belly button. Tummy tucks, however, can allow for a belly button to be reshaped and accommodate the altercation of any umbilical hernias.

The rise in popularity and reasoning for undergoing the operation stems from a variety of reasons, including a person's dissatisfaction with their belly button's overall appearance. However, English Dr. Tijion Esho claims the surge is likely due to changing fashion trends.

"I associate this rise with the trends in fashion, where people are now more comfortable showing their stomachs particularly in pictures shared on social media," Esho told The Independent. "Therefore, as a culture, we are more aware of this region and how we would like it to look."

Pricing for these belly button altering procedures can vary, however. According to Allure, umbilicoplasty can range between $2,500 to $5,000, umbilical hernia repairs are frequently covered by insurance providers and tummy tucks run from $10,000 to $15,0000. 

Belly button Doctors say belly button surgery procedures have managed to rise popularity in early 2018. Here, a woman's belly button is pictured August 23, 2008. Photo: Pixabay