There's arguably nothing more American than turning a presidential debate into a drinking game, and Tuesday night gives you a chance to play with a whole new set of candidates. The first Democratic debate was scheduled to start at 8:30 p.m. EDT, leaving viewers time to pick up six packs after work and get settled in front of the TV (or live stream) for the showdown.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb and former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee were due to attend Tuesday night. They weren't expected to act as catty on stage as some of their Republican counterparts have in the recent GOP debates, but don't fear -- you'll get just as tipsy if you follow these rules. Remember: Be responsible. Don't debate and drive.

Here are the best drinking game rules for the Tuesday Democratic debate, compiled from Alternet, Bustle, Debate Drinking and Cloture Club.

Sip whenever:

  • Someone continues talking after their time is up.
  • Sanders references "the billionaire class."
  • Clinton brings up that she's a grandmother.
  • Someone addresses the needs of the middle class or calls the Republican candidates "out of touch" with reality.
  • Someone defends President Barack Obama.
  • O'Malley talks about his time as the mayor of Baltimore.
  • Someone says "Syria," "minimum wage," "tuition" or "gun control."


Gulp whenever:

  • Someone criticizes Republican front-runner Donald Trump.
  • Clinton is asked about her email scandal.
  • Someone totally avoids a question.
  • Webb defends the Confederate flag.
  • Chafee proposes switching to the metric system.
  • Webb mentions his time serving as secretary of the Navy under former President Ronald Reagan.
  • Someone says "Planned Parenthood," "Keystone Pipeline," "Trans-Pacific Partnership" or "Benghazi."


Chug if:

  • Anderson Cooper starts giggling.
  • Sanders' hair looks crazy.
  • Someone brings up Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard Law School professor who wasn't invited to Tuesday's debate because his poll numbers were too low.
  • Someone is called out for flip-flopping on an issue.
  • Anyone directly insults another candidate.
  • You can't figure out where a candidate stands on an issue.
  • There's a politician on screen whom you don't recognize.


And finish your drink if: 

  • Vice President Joe Biden shows up and announces his candidacy.