Republican candidate Donald Trump said at Wednesday's debate that if elected president his nominees to the United States Supreme Court would interpret the Constitution "the way it was meant to be." The Supreme Court has had a vacancy since Justice Antonin Scalia died in February, and both political parties have been fighting to nominate his replacement.

"I feel that the justices that I am going to appoint — and I've named 20 of them — the justices that I'm going to appoint will be pro-life, they will have a conservative bend, they will be protecting the Second Amendment, they are great scholars in all cases, and they're people of tremendous respect," Trump said. "They will interpret the Constitution the way the founders wanted it interpreted."

Social media seized on the GOP nominee's response, noting that the 18th century document has been amended 27 times. For example, the 13th Amendment, which was ratified in 1865, outlawed slavery. The 19th Amendment, ratified in 1920, gave women the right to vote. (Side note: Trump voters have recently used Twitter to call for the 19th Amendment to be repealed.)

Trump has polled as low as 0 percent with black voters. A Public Religion Research Institute poll released last week found Trump was was more than 30 points behind Democrat Hillary Clinton among women, the Atlantic reported.

 

Trump has polled as low as 0 percent with black voters. A Public Religion Research Institute poll released last week found Trump was was more than 30 points behind Democrat Hillary Clinton among women, the Atlantic reported.

Heading into Wednesday's debate, Trump was trailing Clinton by more than 6 percentage points on average in national polls, according to RealClear Politics. Clinton was polling higher than Trump in all swing states except Iowa and Ohio, according to Politico.

Both candidates faced challenges going into the debate. Trump has recently been accused of sexually assaulting several women and has started claiming the election is rigged, while Clinton has been dealing with fallout from her use of a private email server during her time as secretary of state and WikiLeaks releases of her campaign chairman's emails.

Moderator Chris Wallace set the topics for the Wednesday event. The candidates were set to spend about 15 minutes on each of the following themes: debt and entitlements, immigration, the economy, the Supreme Court, foreign affairs and fitness to be president. But Wallace vowed not to get involved with spats between the two nominees.

"If people say, 'it was a great debate and I don't remember you being there,' I will have done my job," he told Fox News earlier this week.

Neither Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson nor Green Party nominee Jill Stein were invited to the final debate due to low poll numbers.