The famous lyrics sung by Frank Sinatra — “It’s up to you, New York” — held true Tuesday as voters across the Empire State headed to the polls. Both Republican and Democratic presidential candidates were looking for big wins to add to their delegate counts heading into the homestretch before conventions.

For the first time in many years, the Republican and Democratic races in New York could shape the outcome of the presidential primary season. New York businessman and Republican front-runner Donald Trump is looking for a large victory that could determine whether there is a contested convention. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is also hoping for a strong showing to increase her delegate lead against Brooklyn-born Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

On the Republican side, 95 delegates are up for grabs in New York. Trump led the delegate count going into Tuesday’s race with 743, followed by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz with 543 and Ohio Gov. John Kasich with 144. To secure the nomination outright, 1,237 delegates are needed for Republican hopefuls.

If Trump is able to win 50 percent of the overall vote in New York, he will pick up all 14 statewide delegates. If a Republican candidate picks up 50 percent or more of the vote across New York’s 27 congressional districts, which each have three delegates, he would also sweep those delegates.

On the Democratic side, 247 delegates are on the line in New York and 2,383 delegates are needed to secure the nomination. Clinton holds the delegate count lead with 1,307 pledged delegates and 469 superdelegates. Sanders has the support of 1,094 pledged delegates while gaining the support of only 31 superdelegates. Superdelegates are free to switch their support, but the majority of the 712 superdelegates have chosen to back Clinton thus far. For Sanders to maintain a strong challenge against Clinton, he will need to win 68 percent of remaining delegates.

Polls in New York close at 9 p.m. EDT and approximately 90 percent of statewide results are expected by 11 p.m. EDT. International Business Times will have live updates throughout the day on our live blog.

Clinton Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for a photograph with a poll worker before voting in the New York presidential primary election at the Grafflin School in Chappaqua, New York, April 19, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Mike Segar