HONG KONG - Local police who may be planning to clear pro-democracy protesters from the streets will have a big job if they do. Aside from the demonstrators occupying roads around Hong Kong, a veritable tent city has sprung up with artwork, a café and a study center to support a relatively small but dedicated community of protesters.

Occupy protests Hong Kong Tents line the elevated highway along Connaught Road, west of the main protest camp in Hong Kong, Nov, 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

Though the number of protesters has fallen significantly since demonstrations began Sept. 28, there are now thousands of tents at the main protest site in the city's central district. A census conducted by the Occupy movement Tuesday estimated that there are 2,197 tents currently in the area around Hong Kong's government headquarters.

Hong Kong protests Schoolgirls walk through the main protest area in Hong Kong's central district, on Nov 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

Occupy Hong Kong protests The scene looking east from a bridge adjacent to Hong Kong's government headquarters, showing pro-democracy protesters' tents. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

As protesters prepare for a possible crackdown by police, student leaders are still appearing at what has come to be known as "Umbrella Square," the main stage at the central protest site, to encourage supporters. Lester Shum, the deputy secretary general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students (pictured below), urged the crowd late Wednesday not to leave if police attempt to clear the site. Shum said he would be willing to accept arrest and invoke civil disobedience as a legal justification in a court proceeding.

Hong Kong protests Lester Shum Lester Shum, deputy secretary general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students, addresses demonstrators in Hong Kong, Nov. 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

The main protest site is festooned with a vast array of artworks, from origami and cardboard sculptures to installations created from discarded umbrellas.

Hong Kong protests origami Origami umbrellas -- the symbol of Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement -- adorn the campsite outside the city's government headquarters. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

Hong Kong protests sculpture A cardboard sculpture of a figure holding an umbrella is seen at the main protest site at Admiralty in Hong Kong, Nov. 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

Occupy Hong Kong protests An artistic installation created from discarded umbrellas hangs in between two bridges that span the main site of pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, Nov. 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

In addition, a "study center" has sprung up at the admiralty protest site. It features a small library, charging stations for activists and journalists and Wi-Fi. The area also serves as a convenient place for demonstrators to socialize.

Hong Kong protests Activists relax in the 'study center' at Hong Kong's main protest site, Nov. 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

Though police officers are largely absent from the main protest site, the watchful eye of the authorities is never far from demonstrators. These tents, just yards from the main protest site, have a view into the parking lot and offices of the city's main police station. 

Hong Kong protests Tents on an elevated highway in Hong Kong, with a view into the city's main police barracks, in the background, Nov. 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes

Though less crowded, other protest sites around the city continue to occupy major thoroughfares, including this one (below) at Causeway Bay.

CB 2 Protesters camp out in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, Nov. 12, 2014. Photo: Mark Hanrahan / IBTimes