At least nine people were dead and more than 1,000 injured Friday as Japan began to recover from a devastating earthquake that hit the island of Kyushu the day before. Several towns were still without water and power after the Thursday temblor, which the United States Geological Survey measured at magnitude-6.2 but the Japanese Meteorological Agency put at 6.5. Rescue efforts were further complicated by the more than 120 aftershocks had rocked the area as of Friday morning, the Japan Times reported.

And they weren't over.

"This is an earthquake that is going to shake for a long time," meteorologist Chad Myers told CNN, adding that the aftershocks predicted through next week could make the property damage even worse. "The buildings that were damaged in the original shock have now been re-damaged or re-shaken. And all of a sudden you have a cracked building, and it wants to fall down with the second shake."

GettyImages-521334496 A clock stopped at 0:05 is seen in the collapsed house a day after the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake. Photo: Getty Images GettyImages-521327358 A man walks next to a sidewalk covered by rubble in Mashiki, Kumamoto prefecture Friday. Photo: Getty Images RTX2A1AA Firefighters walk among collapsed houses caused by an earthquake in Mashiki town, Kumamoto prefecture. Photo: Reuters

Sony, Toyota, Fujifilm and Mitsubishi Electric were among the firms that shut down Friday to assess damage and conduct safety checks of their plants. Meanwhile, the Associated Press reported more than 1,600 soldiers had been deployed to help residents, delivering items like adult diapers and blankets to shelters. Large groups of people were afraid to leave.

“My husband returned to our house to see how things looked, and he says there isn’t room to stand because of the mess caused," the Guardian reported Kumamoto resident Junko Seto said. “I want to go home and get things in order, but with the aftershocks, I am too scared to go home yet.”

GettyImages-521288258 A man walks on a street covered with rubble in the town of Mashiki, Kumamoto prefecture Friday. Photo: Getty Images GettyImages-521240608 Smoke rises from burnt houses in the town of Mashiki, Kumamoto prefecture, early Friday. Photo: Getty Images GettyImages-521317862 Local residents evacuate from their houses after an earthquake on Friday in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan. Photo: Getty Images

The hardest-hit regions included Mashiki, a city with more than 32,600 people, according to the AP. The earthquake had such an impact because its focus was so close to the surface. However, there was no risk of a tsunami.

Thursday's temblor was the strongest since a 2011 quake in east Japan that killed more than 15,000 people, the Asahi Shimbun reported.

RTX2A1AB A man walks near a damaged road caused by an earthquake in Mashiki town, Kumamoto prefecture, southern Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo Friday. Photo: Reuters RTX29ZM6 Local residents wrap themselves in blankets as they sit on the road in front of the town office building after an earthquake in Mashiki town, Kumamoto prefecture, southern Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo. Photo: Reuters GettyImages-521295632 An aerial view shows damaged Kyushu highway in the city of Mashiki, Kumamoto prefecture Friday. Photo: Getty Images