Kristen Stewart, the Hollywood actress perhaps best known for her role in the "Twilight" movies, has co-authored a new research paper that discusses the use of artificial intelligence technology, to create art in her screenwriting debut film, "Come Swim."

The 17-minute film, starring Josh Kaye and Sydney Lopez, has been written and directed by Stewart. The movie is set to feature in the Sundance Film Festival 2017 that kicked off Thursday. It was inspired by one of Stewart's own paintings that itself originated from one of her poems.

“It’s basically about that moment when you wake up and you get dressed and you realize ... I’m not sad anymore. I’m not saturated anymore. I’ve been dropped back into everyone else’s reality and now I can live again,” Stewart told the New York Times Magazine while describing the concept of the film.

Her paper, released Wednesday on arXiv, an online research repository, was co-authored with David Shapiro, a producer at Starlight Studios (which produced the film) and Bhautik J. Joshi, a research engineer employed by Adobe (whose involvement in the film is not known).

The paper explores a well-known use of machine learning known as style transfer, which converts an image into the “color profile and artistic technique” of another. The filmmakers experimented to the extent that they attempted to alter the algorithm used in the film to “transfer the sense of emotion in the painting,” Quartz reported.

“The painting itself evokes the thoughts an individual has in the first moments of waking (fading in-between dreams and reality). ... This directly drove the look of the shot, leading us to map the emotions we wanted to evoke to parameters in the algorithm,” the authors wrote in the paper.

However, the task appeared to be too difficult and the team ultimately decided not to alter the algorithm and instead chose to modify the images in the film by cropping and adding blocks of texture to the input images to ensure that the modified influences created by artificial intelligence remain included when rendering the final image.

Several Twitter users shared videos of the trailer of "Come Swim."