Kristin Cavallari Responds To Vaccine Criticism: 'I'm Just A Mom'

Kristin Cavallari
Kristin Cavallari married Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler in June. According to the reality-TV star, she still has a home in Los Angeles -- technically making her a resident of California. Reuters

Krisitin Cavallari received mass criticism after she stated that she didn’t want to vaccinate her son, Camden, due to her fear of autism. Hollywood celebrities like Cavallari and Jenny McCarthy have been labeled “anti-vaxxers” by online users who believe their choice to not vaccinate is a dangerous one. But former “Hills” star Cavallari, who is married to Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, said, during a recent interview, that she's just trying to be a good mom.

The issue came up on Tuesday’s “Watch What Happens Live,” when host Andy Cohen said: "Kat George wants to know, 'How can you knowingly support the spread of potentially deadly diseases by not vaccinating your children?'"

Cavallari explained: “At the end of the day, I’m just a mom. I’m trying to make the best decision for my kid.” This time around, she didn't mention autism. “There are very scary statistics out there regarding what is in vaccines and what they cause -- asthma, allergies, ear infections, all kinds of things.”

The pregnant star added: “And we feel like we’re making the best decision for our kids.” Then Cohen said: “A personal decision. Good.” Cavallari, 27, and Cutler, 30, are expecting their second child together. 

[Click here to see the video, courtesy of Radar Online]

The debate over whether or not vaccines cause autism and the potential harm of not vaccinating children exploded during the weekend when Cavallari made her confession about her stance on the issue. McCarthy, co-host of “The View,” also supports the theory that vaccines do more harm than good. McCarthy has even reportedly said that her son’s autism was caused by vaccinations.

It should be noted that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not found a scientific link between vaccines and autism. Still, there are people who believe the Measles Mumps and Rubella (MMR) shot, which is normally administered to a young child around the same time some children begin to show certain signs of autism, causes autism. 

Follow me on Twitter @mariamzzarella

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