MTV executives have ordered changes in a new hit drama called 'Skins' because of fears that some explicit scenes could violate child pornography laws by featuring the sex- and drug-fueled exploits of misfit teenagers.

Skins follow a group of nine friends navigating the often-tumultuous world of high school, involving sex and drugs. The cast includes: James Newman as Tony, Rachel Thevenard as Michelle, Daniel Flaherty as Stanley, Ron Mustafaa as Abbud, Sofia Black D'Elia as Tea, Camille Cresencia-Mills as Daisy, Jesse Carere as Chris, Britne Oldford as Cadie and Eleanor Zich as Eura.

MTV executives are particularly concerned about one episode, which would be broadcast on Jan. 31, that originally showed the posterior of a naked 17-year-old actor as he ran down a street. The producers are now concerned that it may violate federal child pornography statutes.

According to the New York Times, the actor, Jesse Carere, plays Chris, a high school student whose erection - assisted by erectile dysfunction pills - is a punch line throughout the episode.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct. In some cases, a picture of a naked child may constitute illegal child pornography if it is sufficiently sexually suggestive, the Department of Justice guidance says.

According to The New York Times (NYT), 'Skins' is a calculated risk by MTV which is eager to get into the scripted programming business. The channel, a unit of Viacom, has long tested American standards for sexuality and obscenity on television with shows like 'The Real World' and 'Jersey Shore,' NYT reported.

Meanwhile, the racy show has already earned the ire of the Parents Television Council (PTC), which has called on the U.S. Senate and House Judiciary Committees and the Department of Justice to immediately open an investigation regarding child pornography and exploitation on 'Skins.'

In addition to the sexual content on the show involving cast members as young as 15, PTC has counted 42 depictions and references to drugs and alcohol in the premiere episode. The run-time was only 41 minutes excluding commercial breaks.

In a letter addressed to the Committee Chairmen Patrick Leahy and Lamar Smith, PTC President Tim Winter cautioned that the opening episode of 'Skins' included all manner of foul language, illegal drug use, illegal activity as well as thoroughly pervasive sexual content and future episodes promise much more of the same.

We urge you in the strongest possible terms to compel the Attorney General to mount an investigation by the Department of Justice into whether the production of 'Skins' has violated federal law meant to protect minors from exploitation, Winter wrote.

The PTC has also warned parents that the show is the most dangerous program ever for children.

The group has also urged several advertisers, including Taco Bell, General Motors, L'Oreal, Subway and Foot Locker to pull ads from the racy shows.

However, MTV has been quick to deny that it has knowingly produced material that could violate federal laws.

Skins is a show that addresses real-world issues confronting teens in a frank way. We review all of our shows and work with all of our producers on an ongoing basis to ensure our shows comply with laws and community standards. We are confident that the episodes of Skins will not only comply with all applicable legal requirements, but also with our responsibilities to our viewers. We also have taken numerous steps to alert viewers to the strong subject matter so that they can choose for themselves whether it is appropriate, MTV said in a statement.

Question to readers?  What do you think? Is the hit 'Skins' show inappropriate for family viewing? Or has moral policing gone overboard? Leave your comments below.