North Korea ramped up its anti-U.S. and anti-South Korean rhetoric this weekend, calling South Korean President Park Geun-hye a “capricious whore” and a “comfort woman” for the U.S., and particularly for Barack Obama, who the North Koreans call South Korea’s “fancy man.”

The comments came via North Korea’s Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea, an organization that regularly produces biting propaganda for the North Korean government. It was also published by the North Korean propaganda outlet, Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), after President Obama made a two-day trip to South Korea. While the KCNA is known for vehemently lashing out at South Korea and its allies, the latest tirade was particularly biting.

“What Park did before Obama this time reminds one of an indiscreet girl who earnestly begs a gangster to beat someone or a capricious whore who asks her fancy man to do harm to other person while providing sex to him.”

The statement then argued for nuclear war.

“The outcome of Obama's south Korean junket clearly proved that the DPRK was entirely just when it judged and determined that it should counter the U.S., the sworn enemy, by force only, not just talking, and should finally settle accounts with it through an all-out nuclear showdown.”

Biting indeed, juvenile for sure, but out of the ordinary? Yes and no. Like most of its addresses aimed at the South, the statement is obviously meant to provoke anger, but the North Koreans often fall short in their attempts. The attacks make North Korea look like a misbehaving child: petty, childish and somewhat humorous. But this time around, the North Koreans went farther than usual.

They call Park a comfort woman, a term used by the Japanese in WWII to call the droves of Korean and Chinese women they forced into sexual slavery. It’s the darkest image in Korea’s modern history. They also suggest Park should be assassinated like her parents, who were killed when her father, Park Chung-hee, was president in the 1970s.

Kim eui-do, a South Korean government spokesman, said “it is immorality itself for the North to continue to use such unspeakable foul language.”

Park Geun-hye has taken a stern but open approach to working with North Korea. She advocates for a strong South Korean military and a military relationship with the U.S. to deter North Korean aggression. She also defused a tense Kaesong Industrial Complex situation last year. That hasn’t made her very popular with the North Korean government.

The KCNA is the only “news” agency in the North, and offers a shockingly intimate look into how the North depicts the rest of the world to its citizens. South Korea blocks access to KCNA’s website, but you can read English, Russian and Spanish-language KCNA news here.

While the outburst may anger some South Koreans, Scott Snyder, a fellow for Korean studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, said the tirade is really just an indication that Obama’s trip went well.

"One way of measuring the success of U.S.-ROK summits is how the North Koreans respond,” said Snyder, “and by that measure I would say that this meeting -- President Obama's trip to South Korea -- was very successful."