On "Meet the Press" Sunday, President Barack Obama laid out plans for American action against Islamic State, or ISIS. "On Wednesday, I'll make a speech and describe what our game plan's going to be going forward," Obama said.

Obama said he will explain to Americans and congressional leaders this week his plan to "start going on some offense" against ISIS, which he said could become a threat to the U.S.

Obama said the campaign would not involve troops on the ground or an offensive like the one waged during the Iraq War. In the "Meet the Press" interview, Obama described recent counterterrorism campaigns, including the airstrike that killed Al-Shabab leader Ahmed Abdi Godane on Sept. 1. During the conversation, Obama said that prior to any offensive campaign, the U.S. placed intelligence and other resources on the ground and secured U.S. assets and personnel. The second phase of American involvement included airstrikes that helped lead to the recapture of the Mosul Dam. "The next phase, now, is to go on some offense," Obama said.

Concerning Wednesday's speech, Obama told moderator Chuck Todd that he wants to raise awareness of the ISIS threat and plans for American action against the militants. "I want everybody to understand that we have not seen any immediate intelligence about threats to the homeland from ISIL. That's not what this is about. What it's about is an organization that, if allowed to control significant amounts of territory, to amass more resources, more arms, to attract more foreign fighters, including from areas like Europe, Europeans who have visas and then can travel into the United States unimpeded, that over time can be a serious threat," the president said.

As part of the NATO summit in Wales, the U.S. formed an international coalition to take out Islamic State. Sources have told Reuters that the Arab League foreign ministers will issue a resolution supporting a U.S. and Iraqi campaign against ISIS.

Obama's interview with "Meet the Press" can be viewed below.