Fashion designer Rachel Roy might be in some deep trouble if rumors her email was hacked are true. She’s the woman many claim is “Becky with the good hair” from Beyoncé’s track “Sorry.” In the song, Beyoncé essentially claims that her husband, Jay Z, cheated on her with multiple women.

To make things worse, the hacked messages purportedly show she slept with other married men. “Rachel has confided to friends about the stolen emails,” a source told The Sun in an exclusive report Friday. “She has no idea how they’ve been swiped but is aware how much harm they can cause.”

It could be bad news for Roy if the supposed hacked emails were leaked. Beyoncé’s fans, also known as the #BeyHive, already trolled Roy after the single was released last month. They flooded her Instagram comments with emoji of bees and lemons, symbols for Beyoncé and her new album, “Lemonade.”

Jay-Z and Beyoncé at Met Gala 2015 Jay Z and Beyoncé attend the “China: Through the Looking Glass” Costume Institute Benefit Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on May 4, 2015. Photo: Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Roy hoped the ire would die down, but these emails might stir up even more drama. “From a personal level, she wanted to distance herself from the furor after initially playing up to the link as Jay Z’s rumored other woman,” the insider said, adding: “But now she fears the spotlight will be well and truly back on her, Jay Z and Beyoncé if these conversations end up online.”

To make things even worse for Roy, Rita Ora has already been cleared of being “Becky.” She was one of the women fans assumed had an affair with Jay Z, but Beyoncé quashed those rumors at the 2016 Met Gala on Monday. She posed for a selfie with the “Black Widow” singer and wrote “Family” on it. While attending an afterparty, Ora stepped out with a nametag that read, “not Becky.” “Firework” singer Katy Perry wrote the same nametag, but no one accused her of being Becky to begin with.

For her part, Roy denied she is Becky. "I want to put the speculation and rumors to rest. My Instagram post was meant to be fun and lighthearted. It was misunderstood as something other than that," she told People Magazine in an exclusive statement April 26. "There is no validity to the idea that the song references me personally. There is no truth to the rumors." Roy, 42, added: "I would hope that the media sees the real issue here — the issue of cyberbullying — and how it should not be tolerated by anyone."

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