California is now the first state in the nation to successfully convict someone under so-called "revenge porn" laws enacted last year. A Los Angeles man, Noe Iniguez, 36, was sentenced to one year in prison and 36 months probation for violation of California’s new revenge porn law for posting explicit photos of an ex-girlfriend on the Facebook page of her employer.

Revenge porn is considered any type of sexually explicit media that is publicly shared without the consent of the pictured individual. Revenge porn usually appears in the form of videos and photos and is often uploaded via forums or social media sites by angry ex-lovers. 

California's law was enacted in October 2013 and the practice is now illegal in 13 states. Iniguez was found guilty of three criminal counts, including two restraining order violations, under the state revenge porn statute following a weeklong trial.

Superior Court of Los Angeles County Judge David R. Fields also mandated domestic violence counseling and Iniguez was also ordered to stay away from the victim.

“California’s new revenge porn law gives prosecutors a valuable tool to protect victims whose lives and reputations have been upended by a person they once trusted,” City Attorney Mike Feuer said in a press release. “This conviction sends a strong message that this type of malicious behavior will not be tolerated.”

Last December, Iniguez began posting derogatory comments about his ex-girlfriend on her employer’s Facebook page. In March of this year, he posted a topless photograph of the victim on the same Facebook page, calling her a “drunk” and a “slut.” He also encouraged the company to fire her. The victim already had a restraining order against Iniguez since 2011 after he harassed her through text messages following their breakup.

Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Idaho, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin also penalize revenge porn, and a New Jersey law prohibits the “distribution of sexually explicit” photographs, videos and films without the subject’s consent.