Rick Dyer, Bigfoot Hunter, Shares New Photos Of Alleged ‘Monster’ Sasquatch [PHOTOS]

 @ZoeMintzz.mintz@ibtimes.com
on January 29 2014 5:17 PM

bigfoot2 Rick Dyer, a self-proclaimed "master" Bigfoot hunter, has released more photos of a Sasquatch he allegedly killed in 2012.  Twitter

A man who claimed that he shot and killed Bigfoot near a Texas highway in 2012 has shared more photos of the alleged creature.

Rick Dyer initially released a photo earlier this month of what he claims to be the Sasquatch’s preserved corpse. He says he plans on bringing the alleged Bigfoot body on tour to dissuade skeptics.  

"I've heard people say it's fake. They haven't seen the body. They haven't studied it," Dyer told the New York Daily News. "They're just guessing. They're not an expert in what they're talking about."

Dyer says he bought ribs at a nearby Walmart and nailed them to the trees to lure the 8-foot tall animal. 

“Bigfoot ripped the ribs off the tree and casually started to walk away. Every four or five steps, it did the ‘classic Bigfoot’ look, turning its head every few seconds,” Dyer wrote on his website. He said he fired the fatal shot on Sept. 6, 2012 with a rifle after Bigfoot allegedly knocked over his friend.

“I know it sounds crazy, but it's true,” Dyer told the Houston Chronicle.

The 36-year-old self-proclaimed Bigfoot “master tracker” says homeless people in San Antonio area alerted him to the legendary creature. Once he subdued the Sasquatch, Dyer says the body was transported to a laboratory in Washington State where scans and DNA testing were performed.

"It looks like a monster," Dyer said.

bigfoot One of the new photos released by Rick Dyer of the alleged dead Bigfoot.  Twitter

bigfoot3 A photo of the autopsy scar on the alleged Bigfoot.  Twitter

bigfoot4 Rick Dyer, a self-proclaimed "master" Bigfoot hunter, has released more photos of a Sasquatch he allegedly killed in 2012.  Twitter

 

One of the latest photos released shows a scar from the autopsy that allegedly took place on the animal’s body, Andrew Clacy, Dyer’s marketing manager said.

"There's no DNA of a current animal," Clacy said, explaining that the DNA results could not determine what kind of animal it was. "It came back unknown."

The name of the Washington university that allegedly performed the tests has not been released. Dyer says he refused to donate hair and meat samples of the Bigfoot body for research claiming he already has enough proof that the legendary animal exists. The university has medical reports relating to the body, but Clacy declined to release them.

Dyer is aware of the skeptics denying his claim of shooting Bigfoot. “I have a lot of haters,” Dyer said. “But they can all kiss my a-- … because I have more proof than there's ever been.”

According to Snopes.com, a website that debunks popular myths, Dyer made a similar claim of killing a Bigfoot in 2008. At the time he said the creature was 8 feet tall and weighed about 500 pounds. Dyer released a photo of the alleged Sasquatch inside a freezer and promised to share DNA evidence belonging to the supposed body. At a press conference the Bigfoot body turned out to be an ape costume.

At the time "Sasquatch Detective" Steve Kulls realized the body was a fake when it began to thaw.

"Within the next hour of thaw, a break appeared up near the feet area," Kulls wrote. "As the team and I began examining this area near the feet, I observed the foot, which looked unnatural, reached in and confirmed it was a rubber foot."

Dyer defended his actions by claiming that someone confiscated the body before the press conference and he brought the costume in an effort to produce something.

According to Benjamin Radford, deputy editor of skeptic magazine Skeptical Inquirer, says if Dyer’s latest Bigfoot find is real, a reputable scientific publication would support the findings.

“If Bigfoot researchers wish to be taken seriously, they could start by cleaning their own house. The biggest threat to their credibility is not skeptics nor a ridiculing public but instead those who provide an endless stream of bogus claims and evidence,” Radford wrote.

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