Saudi Arabian officials said Tuesday the nation has recently arrested 93 people affiliated with the Islamic State group. This action, they told the Associated Press, stopped a number of planned attacks -- including one on the United States Embassy there.

The embassy did not comment. But Maj. Gen. Mansour Al-Turki, the spokesman for the ministry of the interior, said authorities detained fighters last month who had intended to send a suicide car bomb to the Riyadh office. They also arrested 65 people who had been organizing a strike on residential areas and security forces.

Earlier this month, Saudi Arabia jailed two men -- Nawaf bin Sharif Samir al-Anzi and Yazid bin Mohammed Abdulrahman Abu Niyan -- in connection with an April 8 police shooting. Authorities allege that ISIS instructed the suspects to kill two officers in Riyadh, according to the Saudi Press Agency. One was supposed to fire while the other drove the car and photographed the attack. Police also found three booby-trapped cars, bombs, cell phones and guns. 

Agence France-Presse reported that investigations continued this week into the incident, which Al-Turki called the fifth ISIS attack in Saudi Arabia. The nation is one of several in the U.S.-led coalition conducting airstrikes on the group in Syria and Iraq, and last year it donated $500 million in humanitarian aid for Iraq, according to CNN.

Other countries have broken up terror organizations in recent months, as well. This past weekend, Malaysia detained 12 ISIS-linked people with plans to attack near Kuala Lumpur, and Canada disrupted a cell in February. "Through each terrorist-related charge we lay and each arrest we make, we send a message, which illustrates our strong resolve to root out terrorist threats," Royal Canadian Mounted Police Chief Superintendent Jennifer Strachan said at a news conference.

ISIS is known for its recruiting techniques, which CNN reported have drawn more than 20,000 people to Syria to join the fight.