A recent survey suggests a high percentage of Americans don't mind their manners on mobile phones.

The survey, sponsored by Intel Corporation and conducted by research firm Ipsos, looked to uncover the state of mobile etiquette in the United States. What they found was not pretty. Eighty eight percent of those surveyed say they have seen people use mobile technology in ways that would be considered rude, or at least mildly annoying. The top pet peeves are talking on mobile devices while driving (73 percent), loudly using a phone in public places (65 percent), and using a mobile device while walking on the street (28 percent).

The rapid adoption of smartphones is not helping -- in fact, smartphones have only made it worse. Seventy five percent of those surveyed say mobile manners are worse than they were one year ago.

Interestingly enough, despite the high numbers reporting breaches of mobile etiquette, only 19 percent of the people surveyed actually admitted to doing it.

The novel idea of public displays of technology, has become more of a reality the last few years thanks to sleeker phones which come with more capabilities. Intel's head of interaction and experience research Genevieve Bell said the newness of public displays of technology is one reason why people haven't learned how to be polite -- or at least less rude.

New digital technologies are becoming a mainstay in consumers' lives, but we haven't yet worked out for ourselves, our families, communities and societies what all the right kinds of behaviors and expectations will be, Bell said in a statement. Our appropriate digital technology behaviors are still embryonic, and it's important for Intel and the entire industry to maintain a dialogue about the way people use technology and our personal relationships with technology as they continue to help shape societal and cultural norms.

Cell phone technology has nearly reached the entire U.S. A recent survey from the Pew Internet & American Life project found 85 percent of adults own a cell phone, far more than any other major technological device.

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