The first hour of Charlie Rose's two-hour interview with Apple CEO Tim Cook has already showed up online. Tonight, PBS aired the second half.

After speaking during the first half on topics ranging from the United States' domestic spying program to Google as an Apple competitor, Cook opened up tonight about the intersection between business and privacy and about how he values diversity at Apple. A stream is not yet available for it, but here are some choice quotes from Cook.

What drives Apple: "I was at Compaq at a time where the objective was to become a $40 billion company. Well, employees don't get excited about that. This isn't something you wake up and you go, 'I'm going to take the hill today to do 40' -- I mean, you know? It's just not that. But changing the world? These are the things that people work for. And this pushes people. And so, this is who we are as people. And it's the values of our company. It's been the values of our company forever. And it's to Steve's credit. He put these values in the company… I know I probably said it too many times, but it's a privilege of a lifetime to be there, because I think there's no place like it on earth."

His values on diversity at Apple: “That everyone deserves a basic level of human rights, regardless of their color, regardless of their religion, regardless of their sexual orientation, regardless of their gender. That everyone deserves respect. And, you know, I’ll fight for it until my toes point out. ... There’s still too many cases in the world and in the United States where there’s a class kind of structure or where voting or people are trying to convince each other that this other group of people don’t deserve the same rights. And I think it’s crazy, I think it’s un-American. I think it doesn’t belong. And I also see as a businessman in Apple, I can see the value in diversity. I see a tremendous company that because we don’t judge each other, because we don’t have different rights and so forth because we allow anyone in the front door. I see a company where this inclusion really inspires innovation. And so I see the value of it from that point of view as well. But from a -- more from a human point of view, I feel it’s just and right.”

Apple's view on customer privacy: “Our business is not based on having information about you. You’re not our product. Our product are these, and this watch, and Macs, and so forth. And so we run a very different company. I think everyone has to ask, how do companies make their money? Follow the money. And if they’re making money mainly by collecting gobs of personal data, I think you have a right to be worried.”