Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg went to Harvard. Then he co-founded Facebook. So what's up with his grammar in a leaked e-mail that provides new insight into how he callously diluted co-founder Eduardo Saverin's stake in the company to a weak 10 percent?

This article will help get to the bottom of his shockingly bad grasp of the English language.

Zuck, who is getting a lot of attention as the Facebook IPO nears, even has an error in the first sentence of the e-mail, which Business Insider released on Tuesday.

This email should probably be attorney-client privileged, not quite how to do that though, he writes, dropping the word sure.

And in the next sentence, he goes on to write the following clunky sentence: We think we can maybe almost justify and if not, we'll just deal with it later.

But it really gets hairy in the third sentence, which uses the word bonus as a verb and fails to present a coherent thought, though we can assume his attorney figured out a way to determine what he was saying in order to keep getting those fat .com paychecks:

We also agreed that if the company bonusing us the amount we need for the shares, plus tax, is a good solution to the problem of us all being completely broke, he wrote. Faulkner he isn't.

Is it all just a function of being online 24/7? Of basking in the monitor's blue glow for too many hours? Or is he really just bad with words?

Does it really matter? The 28-year-old man who's about to pull down nearly $50 billion on Friday, when the Facebook IPO takes place, is a billionaire and one of the richest tech geniuses in the world, his generation's Bill Gates.

But the Saverin e-mail is a revealing look at his inability to craft a perfect sentence, as well as his ruthless approach to business. It's an insight into the mind of a man who has changed the world.

Here's the full text of the e-mail, as it was printed by Business Insider:

[Redacted],

This email should probably be attorney-client privileged, not quite how to do that though.

Anyhow, Sean and I have agreed that a price of one-half cent per share is the way to go for now. We think we can maybe almost justify and if not, we'll just deal with it later.

We also agreed that if the company bonusing us the amount we need for the shares, plus tax, is a good solution to the problem of us all being completely broke.

As far as Eduardo goes, I think it's safe to ask for his permission to make grants. Especially if we do it in conjunction with raising money. It's probably even OK to say how many shares we're adding to the pool. It's probably less OK to tell him who's getting the shares, just because he might have adverse reaction initially. But I think we may even be able to make him understand that.

Is there a way to do this without making it painfully apparent to him that he's being diluted to 10%?

OK, that's all for now. I'll send you the list of grants I need made in another email in a second. Sean can send you grants for his people when he stops coughing up his lungs.

Hope you guys both feel better,
Mark