When Will Tsunami Hit Chile? Home Videos Shared After 8.2-Magnitude Earthquake

Chile
Chile has been experiencing earthquakes for the past two weeks but on Tuesday night an 8.2-magnitude quake rocked the country and created a tsunami warning. Reuters

After a powerful 8.2-magnitude earthquake shook the northern coast of Chile Tuesday night, the region prepared for a possibly dangerous tsunami, the Associated Press reported. Authorities ordered evacuation of coastal areas.

No deaths have been reported at this time.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center issued a warning for all of South America's Pacific coast and Chile's Emergency Office added that huge tsunami wave is expected to hit the island of Juan Fernandez just before midnight local time.

Waves that are nearly two meters (6 1/2 feet) have already hit. According to images from local TV stations, residents have been evacuating homes calmly.

Hawaii has been put on standby to see if it too will be hit with a tsunami. According to Reuters, the Chilean government has not posted an immediate reports of serious damage or injuries after the massive quake hit off the coast.

"We have asked citizens to evacuate the entire coast ... there is no serious damage to houses ... there have been no people hurt," said Home Office Minister Mahmud Aleuy.

Many people who experienced the earthquake have begun to post videos and pictures to social media.

Instagram user fashionrenechile posted a few videos. One showed the tsunami warning sirens going off in Iquique and another showed a traffic jam that appears to be caused by people trying to get to higher ground.

IG user fecamargo77 shared a picture of what the streets looked like from a bird's eye view after the evacuations were under way. 

Breakingnews.com posted a YouTube video of an earthquake.. The headline of the video reads “Chile Earthquake 8 0 Earthquake VIDEO Chile Tsunami Warning Terremoto.” The video, which looks like it’s from surveillance footage, shows an office room shaking but after a few minutes it begins to shake strongly. Objects fall off of shelves and people in the building appear to run for safety. Some, however, have commented that the video was from the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that hit the capital, Santiago, in 2010.

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