In the wake of the firing of famed head coach Joe Paterno, there is a great deal of mixed emotions about the way Penn State has handled the situation.

While Paterno and president Dr. Graham B. Spanier were dismissed by the board of trustees effective immediately on Wednesday night for their failure to pursue police action on former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, the witness to Sandusky's abuse in 2002 remains with the school.

Mike McQueary, now the wide receivers coach, was a graduate assistant at the time he allegedly saw Sandusky shower with a young boy, but will be coaching for the Nittany Lions against Nebraska on Saturday.

As a 28-year-old graduate assistant, McQueary reportedly called his father after watching Sandusky's sex act. McQueary, along with Paterno and key members of the athletic department, came under fire for not alerting authorities.

Penn State officials have limited their public comments due to an ongoing investigation. Both Paterno and McQueary have not made full statements about their role in the Sandusky allegations.

It's not that he's not willing (to address the scandal), McQueary's father told The New York Times. I think it's eating him up not to be able to tell his side, but he's under investigation by the grand jury. He'll make it. He's a tough kid.

Defensive coordinator Tom Bradley, now the interim coach, said in a Thursday press conference that it will be a game-time decision on whether McQueary will coach from the sideline or from the press box on Saturday. 

ESPN's Joe Schad reported that there might be safety concerns for McQueary.

It is curious to many why Paterno was fired, and not McQueary, considering McQueary's more central role in allegations. Trevor Matich, an ESPN analyst, suggested that McQueary should step down, and that his presence with the team will be a distraction.

There are only three games remaining on Penn State's schedule. Penn State is ranked No. 12 and host Nebraska on Saturday, and then will play road matches against traditional powerhouse Ohio State, and No. 16 Wisconsin.