President Donald Trump’s may be looking to shake up his staff, according to reports that suggest that Trump is mulling change and is soliciting advice from his friends and senior aides. Those under scrutiny include National security advisor Michael Flynn, Press Secretary Sean Spicer and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus.

National security advisor Flynn has been at the center of controversy since a Washington Post story published last week suggested that he violated laws prohibiting private citizens from engaging in foreign policy when he discussed U.S. sanctions against the Kremlin with Sergei Kislyak, Moscow's ambassador to Washington, in December.

Reuters reported early Monday that Kremlin has issued a denial on the Flynn controversy. However, support for Flynn is considered to waning as Stephen Miller, President Donald Trump's top policy adviser, did not back Flynn in a number of interviews.

Although Trump, who has been at Mar-a-Lago, his club in Florida, over the weekend, has not yet commented on the Flynn story, individuals familiar with the matter, speaking on the conditions of anonymity, told Politico that the president is concerned about the allegations against Flynn.

"He thinks he's a problem…I would be worried if I was General Flynn," Politico quoted an a person believed to be close to President Trump.

Apart from Flynn, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer is also failing to inspire confidence in the president. Trump is believed to have criticized his staff, saying: "how his people didn't give him good advice" on executing the travel ban, while adding that he should have delayed signing it rather than "rushing it like they wanted me to." He also questioned why his staff was not prepared with a legal team to defend the executive order that ordered the travel ban.

However, Reince Priebus may be the first head to roll as Politico reported that several Trump campaign aides have begun to draft lists of possible replacements, including other White House aides such as Kellyanne Conway, Rick Dearborn, lobbyist David Urban and economic advisor Gary Cohn.

Although these internal changes are not official and are still firmly in the realm of speculation, observers are awaiting the former reality star turned President to bring back the “You're Fired” catchphrase from his hit television show “The Apprentice.” Trump defied popular expectation last month, when he didn’t use his catchphrase while removing the acting attorney general Sally Yates, for refusing to implement his travel ban.

via GIPHY