The Quaker Oats Company is recalling a small lot of Cap’n Crunch Peanut Butter Crunch cereal for a potential salmonella risk. The recall only affects 21 boxes of the cereal sold at five different Target stores in Nebraska, Missouri, and Kansas.

The affected cereal was purchased after Nov. 5 and is packaged in 17.1-ounce boxes. It has a UPC code of 0 30000 6211 1 and two potential Best Before Dates, July 30, 2019 or July 31, 2019. The cereal was sold at the five following stores:

  • Super Target: 4001 N 132nd St , Omaha, NE
  • P-Fresh: 4250 Rusty Rd, Saint Louis, MO
  • Super Target: 10800 E 21st St N, Witchita, KS
  • Super Target: 8201 S 40th St., Lincoln, NE
  • P-Fresh: 1040 NE Coronado, Blue Springs, MO

Quaker Oats has advised consumers that have purchased the recalled cereal to stop consuming it immediately and to discard its contents. Customers can also return them to the specific Target location where they purchased the cereal for a full refund.

Quaker Oats voluntarily recalled the cereal after routine sampling revealed that it contained the salmonella bacteria. Salmonella can cause fever diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The bacteria can also get into the bloodstream and cause more severe illnesses in some people, especially children, elderly adults, and people with weakened immune systems.

There are no other Quaker products being recalled at this time, according to the company. Quaker Oats is working with the Food and Drug Administration on the recall. No illnesses related to the salmonella have been reported to the company.

Questions about the Cap’n Crunch Peanut Butter Crunch cereal recall can be answered by calling Pepsi Co. at 1-800-234-6281, Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST. More information can also be found at cu.pepsico.com/capncrunch.

Quaker Oats Recall Quaker Oats has recalled boxes of Cap’n Crunch Peanut Butter Crunch cereal sold at select stores. A large box of Quaker Oats is displayed in a first-floor lobby window on Dec. 4, 2000 at Quaker's headquarters in Chicago. Photo: Getty Images/Tim Boyle