KEY POINTS

  • The bed are designed to collapse under the weight of fornicators
  • Some of the beds will be repurposed for use by athletes for the Paralympics
  • Organizers for the Olympics also began distributing condoms to athletes

Athletes competing in this year’s Tokyo Olympics would sleep on cardboard beds designed to discourage sex amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Organizers for the Olympic Games have set up 18,000 cardboard beds in the Athletes’ Village designed to collapse under the weight of fornicators. The beds, made from recycled cardboard, are created by Japanese bedding company Airweave.

The cardboard beds come with customizable, modular mattresses also made by Airweave. Of the 18,000 beds made for the Games, 8,000 will be repurposed for the Paralympics, according to Dezeen magazine.

"The concept was to make a lightweight, easy-to-assemble mattress and meet the Games' Sustainability Plan," the Japanese company told the magazine. “Our signature modular mattress design allows for firmness customizations at the shoulder, waist and legs to achieve proper spine alignment and sleep posture, allowing for the highest level of personalization for each athlete's unique body type.”

The beds are expected to be donated to national organizations after use by athletes in both the Olympics and Paralympics. 

Photos of the recycled cardboard beds were first shared on social media by American distance runner Paul Chelimo.

“Beds will be able to withstand the weight of a single person to avoid situations beyond sports. I see no problem for distance runners, even 4 of us can do,” he wrote in the caption.  

Rhys McClenaghan, an Irish gymnast, also shared a video on his Twitter account showing him jumping on his bed, which he referred to as the "anti-sex bed."  

Organizers for the Olympics also began distributing more than 160,000 condoms to this year’s participating athletes. However, officials insist the condoms are meant for athletes to bring home and promote safe sex as well as raise awareness of the dangers of HIV. 

“Our intent and goal is not for athletes to use the condoms at the Olympic Village, but to help with awareness by taking them back to their own countries,” the organizers said in a statement to Japan Today

As of writing, at least three athletes have already tested positive for COVID-19, two of whom lived at the Olympic Village. All athletes who were diagnosed with the novel coronavirus are “non-Japanese.”

Olympics chief Thomas Bach (L) has praised Tokyo has the 'best-ever prepared' host city Olympics chief Thomas Bach (L) has praised Tokyo has the 'best-ever prepared' host city Photo: POOL / Takashi Aoyama