Following three earlier recalls for pet pig ears for Salmonella contamination, Brutus & Barnaby has also issued a recall for its Pig Ears for Dogs because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect humans through the handling of the recalled pet treat as well as dogs that have consumed the pig ears.

The recalled pig ears have a trademark logo from Brutus & Barnaby and are labeled as Pig Ears 100% Natural Treats for Dogs. They were sold in four different sizes – 8, 12, 25, and 100 counts. The affected pig ears were distributed throughout the U.S. and sold online at Amazon.com, Chewy.com, Brutusandbarnaby.com, and in stores at Natures Food Patch.

Labels of the recalled pig ears can be viewed here.

Consumers should destroy all recalled pig ears from Brutus & Barnaby. They can contact the place of purchase for a full refund. Questions about the recall can be directed to the company at 1-800-489-0970, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET.

Individuals that have been infected with Salmonella may have symptoms of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fever. In some instances, Salmonella illnesses can result in more serious conditions, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Anyone that displays symptoms of Salmonella infection should contact their healthcare provider.

Pets that are infected with Salmonella may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. They may also show symptoms of decreased appetite, fever, and abdominal pain. Some pets can be carriers of Salmonella and infect other animals and humans. If a pet shows symptoms of Salmonella infection, they should be seen by a veterinarian.

Brutus & Barnaby has stopped the production and distribution of its pig ears. It is currently working with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to investigate the cause of the Salmonella contamination.

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