South Korea dismissed North Korea's latest military drills aimed at Seoul as a "childish act." The stern warning came after Pyongyang held a military drill that stimulated an attack on the South, CNN reported.

"(We) view the drill from yesterday as a childish act to display that their system is undiminished, in response to our internal situation," South Korean Unification Ministry spokesman Jeong Joon-hee said during a press conference Monday. "Kim Jong Un has been continuously visiting its military units since November and it has been escalating tension. We strongly condemn it."

The tensions between North Korea and South Korea come as South Korean President Park Guen-hye was impeached Friday over accusations that her close friend was given unauthorized access to the highest levels of government. Acting President Hwang Kyo-ahn warned last week that North Korea might see the instability in South Korea as an opportunity to cause mischief.  

"While retaining a watertight national defense posture, the government will work closely with the international community to thoroughly respond to the North Korean nuclear problem," Hwang said.

Childish appears to be a favorite insult between the two warring nations. Last week, North Korea called South Korea's allegations that Pyongyang had carried out a cyberattack against Seoul a "childish, slanderous ploy." This latest exchange of barbs came after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un oversaw Sunday a combat drill by a special operation battalion that included South Korea's presidential Blue House as a target.

"Well done, the enemy troops will have no space to hide themselves, far from taking any counteraction," Kim reportedly said after watching the drill, according to North Korean state media KCNA.

Kim also reportedly offered advice on a "guerilla warfare" invasion of its southern neighbor and rival. "(Kim) said that if the service personnel of the unit are to conduct bold combat actions with the southern part of Korea as their theater, they should stage intensive drills for marching, firing, swimming, overcoming natural obstacles and acquiring ability to maneuver in fields under the simulated conditions of an actual battle," the report added.