15 Spooky Spots In L.A. : Including The Original 'American Horror Story: Hotel'

The Novogratz Family and SeriusFun Childrens Network Halloween Haunted House.Getty Images
The Hotel Roosevelt is reportedly among one of the most haunted places in Los Angeles. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Turner
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Now home to Cinefamily, the Silent Movie Theatre at 611 N. Fairfax Ave. is said to be haunted by the ghosts of its first two owners. John Hampton opened the theater in 1942 and dedicated his life to preserving silent film, unfortunately, by the way of using using toxic chemicals that eventually gave him cancer. Lawrence Austin reopened the theater after Hampton's death in the early '90s but in 1997, he was fatally shot in the lobby in a plot concocted by his lover. Hampton is said to haunt the upstairs lounge while Austin covers the lobby. Sam McManis/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images
The Knickerbocker, which is now a senior living facility at 1714 Ivar Ave., was originally built as an apartment building in 1925, then became a fancy hotel. Lwgdnd has it some A-Listers have stuck around. Rudolph Valentino is now said to haunt the bar while Marilyn Monroe supposedly hangs out in the ladies' room. Other happenings at the Knickerbocker included director DW Griffith's death in the lobby and actress Frances Farmer's arrest on her way to insanity. Following Harry Houdini's death on Halloween 1926, his widow Bess attempted to contact him at the hotel every year for ten years with a seance on the roof. Mel Bouzad/Getty Images
This is the kind of place that was made for ghost stories. The ship, docked in Long Beach as a floating hotel and event space, has been reported haunted by countless visitors who claim to hear voices and rattling chains during tours and overnight stays.The Queen Mary started as a luxury liner, setting forth on her maiden voyage from Southampton, England, in 1937 and hosting everyone from Bob Hope to Winston Churchill. But when WWII began, the Queen Mary was drafted into service as a ferry ship, carrying thousands of troops into battle areas. The fancy ship was stripped of her glamorous facade, painted a camo grey and dubbed the “Grey Ghost.” JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images
This famous basement bar below the Townhouse restaurant 52 Windward Ave. in Venice was a true speakeasy during the Prohibition era. Back then, the speakeasy hide its booze in underground tunnels, which are now used as utility hallways. Some say former proprietor Frank Bennett, who owned the bar from 1972 until his death in 2003, still haunts his favorite corner booth, across from the bar.Courtesy of Townhouse
The studio complex at 9336 Washington Blvd., where such legendary films as "Gone with the Wind" and "Raging Bull" were filmed was built in 1918 by silent movie pioneer Thomas Ince.He was reported dead in 1924, after falling ill on newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst’s yacht during a star-studded cruise and dinner. The official cause of death was listed as heart failure but rumor has it has it that Ince was actually shot and killed by a jealous Hearst, who was supposedly aiming at (and missed) Charlie Chaplin, who had eyes for Hearst’s mistress Marion Davies. Some say Ince’s ghost still shows up for work at his former studio and can be seen and heard walking through walls and criticizing management.Rick Meyer/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Dan Aykroyd was living in the house at 7708 Woodrow Wilson Dr. when he got the idea for Ghostbusters. The actor  says he was inspired by the house's paranormal activity which included door locking, lights going on and off and a piano playing itself. The ghosts could be former occupants "Mama" Cass Elliot or actress Natalie Wood.Instagram
The Comedy Store's building at 8433 Sunset Blvd, originally housed Ciro's, a hot mob hangout in the '40s and '50s. The building still has peepholes in the upper walls of the main room that once allowed mobsters to see who was coming and going. Mickey “The King of the Sunset Strip” Cohen used the club as his base of operations. It is now said to be haunted by several hit men, as well as a woman who performed illegal abortions in the downstairs lounge. Voices and even snarls have been reported coming from the basement.  Frazer Harrison/Getty Images